March 11th, 2013
03:04 PM ET

What we're reading

By Fareed Zakaria

Despite the speculation that this could be the year where “war or peace will break out” over Iran’s nuclear program, 2013 will more likely be another year of stalemate, argues Nader Mousavizadeh in the FT.

“This is mostly all theater. The reality is that for each of the principal parties, the status quo – Iran isolated diplomatically, crippled economically, boxed in militarily – is preferable to the available alternatives.

“An all-out war including weeks of strikes on suspected nuclear installations and widespread Iranian retaliation through conventional and unconventional means is, for most, anathema. It is also true, though unacknowledged by the west, that a genuine peace with Tehran is equally unattractive.”

If the two-state solution dies, “Israel will only be left with ugly options,” writes Ben Birnbaum in the New Republic, adding that the window is closing for a two-state solution.

“It could ride out the status quo as the world continues to turn against it. It could unilaterally create a Palestinian state by withdrawing to the line of the barrier, incurring most of the costs of a two-state solution with few of the benefits. It could annex the West Bank and give all Palestinians citizenship, making Israel a binational state. Or it could annex the entire West Bank without giving Palestinians citizenship, embracing apartheid.”

Egypt’s financial reserves are declining and the country is nearing a new breaking point, argues David Ignatius in the Washington Post. And President Morsy is doing little about it.

“The wolf is two or three months from Egypt’s door, top U.S. officials believe. Meanwhile, the country is facing increasing political turmoil, with riots Tuesday in Port Said that left 50 wounded. Morsi’s government sent a new proposal to the IMF last week, but it may fall short of the IMF’s reform targets, further delaying action.”

The U.S. constitution is alone in omitting any written conditions under which the government can regulate arms and munitions,” write Zachary Elkins, Tom Ginsburg and James Melton on Bloomberg.

“In other countries, the right is typically limited to self-defense, either of the home or the state itself. Guatemala gives its citizens the right to own weapons for personal use in the home and states that citizens can only be forced to relinquish guns by judicial order. Haiti gives citizens the right to use guns to defend the home but explicitly denies a general right to bear arms.”


soundoff (6 Responses)
  1. Muin

    I read a 41 year old diplomatic cableonline which happened between Henry kissinger and ambassador. The cable was just released in a Bangladeshi newspaper. Henry Kissinger could have stopped 26th march genocide in Bangladesh. No one expects that from cold heart monster Nixon but I expected that from Kissinger because his people just fought nazi's 25 years ago for committing genocide against jewish people. 26th march genocide was massive one in Bangladesh and it continued on for 9 months. They not only just killed but they killed bangladesh's best and brightest.

    March 12, 2013 at 2:14 am | Reply
    • Thinker23

      Can you elaborate on this please? I'm interested to know more about the supernatural powers that would allow Mr. Kissinger to stop the massacres in Bangladesh or any other country.

      March 12, 2013 at 11:38 am | Reply
  2. j. von hettlingen

    Nader Mousavizadeh wrote in the FT that "a genuine peace with Tehran is equally unattractive."
    Indeed, it's difficult to compromise. Either the US and Israel accept Iran's nuclear ambition, which is quite unlikely, or Iran sticks to its nuclear programme JUST for peaceful purposes, which is also quite unlikely.

    March 12, 2013 at 9:58 am | Reply
  3. Thinker23

    “It [Israel] could ride out the status quo as the world continues to turn against it. It could unilaterally create a Palestinian state by withdrawing to the line of the barrier, incurring most of the costs of a two-state solution with few of the benefits. It could annex the West Bank and give all Palestinians citizenship, making Israel a binational state. Or it could annex the entire West Bank without giving Palestinians citizenship, embracing apartheid.”

    It is obvious that the Palestinians are unable and unwilling to negotiate a peace agreement they will comply with meaning that Israel is left with the four options above. The current status quo can not last forever. Annexing the West Bank will not make Israel a binational state, it will make it an ARAB state where Jews are as welcome as they're in Gaza. Annexing the West Bank but not giving the Palestinians citizenship will make Israel an apartheid state and will end Israel as a sovereign state no less effectively. This leaves us with the second option, unilateral Israeli withdrawal to lines defined by Israel and creation of a Palestinian state even if the Palestinians do not want it. Itr seems to be the only realistic option today.

    March 12, 2013 at 12:00 pm | Reply
  4. Pete

    Yes we don't to be friendlier to any foriegn countries because when we do they automatically figure for foriegn aid ..It's like throwing a nice party and after your quests are drunk off your booze you have to call taxis to get them home and pay for it too..That's the problem with Netanyahu and Isreal for example ,they start crap being the chosen ones always knowing we'll back their sorry asses up but one day I'd like to see it when they open up their big jewish mouths ,create problems and no America to their rescue..Boy would that hurt wouldn't it and teach their country a lesson that no money from wealthy American Jews could buy and then it might change their thinking but not before then!!

    March 13, 2013 at 6:50 pm | Reply
  5. euhunza

    For Egypt, Iran and other Muslim country what have any kind of stand off with USA, the peace deal with USA is quite unattractive as the world knows US power is declining and it has no credibility t force any country any more to convince for its evil ends. This time it might be Israel's turn to be inflicted with wrath in international scenario as Mahmood Zahar of Hamas also mentioned that Third Intifada is inevitable.

    March 14, 2013 at 12:27 pm | Reply

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