Did China make strategic error with air zone?
November 26th, 2013
11:52 AM ET

Did China make strategic error with air zone?

By Michael Mazza, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Michael Mazza is a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. The views expressed are his own.

It’s difficult to know precisely what was behind China’s decision to institute an East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) at the weekend. Chinese claims to the contrary, it is clearly meant to up the pressure on Japan in the two countries’ dispute over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, over which the ADIZ extends. Internal Chinese political dynamics may also be at work here; President Xi Jinping, for example, must be benefitting from taking a strong stance vis-à-vis Japan. But whatever the reason for the creation of the ADIZ at this time, Beijing may ultimately regret it – and not only because it increases the likelihood of a violent incident over the East China Sea.

First off, the move needlessly antagonizes Taiwan and South Korea. The fact is that it puts a wrinkle into recently stable cross-Strait relations, as Taiwan also claims sovereignty over the Senkakus (known as the Diaoyutai in Taiwan), and it now has an overlapping ADIZ with the mainland.

The ADIZ is even more surprising in the context of China-South Korea relations, which have looked particularly warm of late. Seoul’s quarrels with Japan over history have been at their worst in recent months, and Beijing has effectively stoked that fire. But China’s new ADIZ overlaps with South Korea’s; covers the disputed Socotra Rock (which both countries claim as within their own exclusive economic zone); and may extend a bit too close for comfort to Jeju Island, where South Korea is building a major naval base. In one fell swoop, Beijing has reminded Seoul that South Korea has more in common with Japan than it normally likes to admit.

Second, rather than lead to heightened wariness in Washington about getting caught in the middle of the dispute, the United States clearly considers the ADIZ a challenge to its support for Japan and its ability to operate freely in international airspace above the East China Sea. That explains the promptness with which Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel issued statements about the ADIZ.

More from GPS: Why Asia is arguing over its islands

Kerry expressed deep concern and described the ADIZ creation as an “escalatory” and “unilateral action” designed to “change the status quo” in the region. After also expressing concern and describing the action as “destabilizing,” Hagel felt compelled to assert that the implementation of the ADIZ “will not in any way change how the United States conducts military operations in the region” and to “reaffirm” that “Article V of the U.S. Japan Mutual Defense Treaty applies to the Senkaku Islands.” An unnamed U.S. official told the Wall Street Journal that “there would likely be a demonstration of American military resolve to continue operating in the area of the islands without Chinese interference.”

Both statements – especially Hagel’s – are a boost for Japan, and neither was well received in Beijing. But things could get even worse for China. Indeed, Beijing will have much more cause for concern if the ADIZ leads the United States to alter its officially neutral position on the sovereignty dispute, something that Washington has thus far been at pains to avoid.

In his statement, Kerry noted that “we don’t support efforts by any state to apply its ADIZ procedures to foreign aircraft not intending to enter its national airspace.” This raises an interesting question: If U.S. aircraft operating in the vicinity of the Senkakus refuse Chinese requests for identification, will that mark an implicit rejection of Chinese claims to sovereignty over the islands?

An explicit recognition of Japanese sovereignty, moreover, may no longer be considered out of bounds in Washington. China has consistently opted for escalation over the past 14 months; the ADIZ is only the latest action to not only test Japan but the U.S.-Japan alliance as well. U.S. policy regarding the Senkakus has always been somewhat confusing: the United States recognizes Japanese administration of the islands, but takes no position on competing sovereignty claims, while considering defense of the islands to be a treaty obligation. The logic for maintaining that policy is weakening. An Obama administration that must be growing tired of China’s tests may be looking for ways to communicate in unqualified terms that the U.S.-Japan alliance is an unshakeable one.

Japan, meanwhile, will be looking for ways to communicate its own resolve in the face of Chinese pressure. Since the Japanese government’s purchase from private owners of three of Senkaku islands last year, Japan’s actions have generally been non-escalatory. But Tokyo can issue only so many diplomatic demarches, and has increasingly limited alternative means of signaling steadfastness to Beijing. The government has long toyed with the idea of stationing officials on the islands. As the Wall Street Journal reported in September:

“A top Japanese government official said Tuesday that stationing government officials on a group of disputed islands is one way of strengthening Japan’s claim to them…Placing government officials on the islands ‘remains one option,’ chief government spokesman Yoshihida Suga told reporters at a regular news conference. ‘Under what circumstance we’ll consider [that option] will be decided strategically,’ Mr. Suga said.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his advisors may be considering whether now is the time. But regardless of what they decide in this instance, Chinese actions are likely pushing Japan closer to adopting this course rather than intimidating Tokyo into inaction.

Over the last year, China may have succeeded in altering the decades-long status quo in the East China Sea. But actions once apparently aimed at upsetting the reality of Japanese control of the islands now increasingly appear aimed at asserting Chinese control. The difference may be subtle, but it marks a dangerous threshold. Crossing it may lead Japan, the United States, and others to take the very steps that Beijing most wants to forestall.

It’s still too soon to tell, but China’s new ADIZ may prove to be a strategic blunder – one that ultimately puts China’s own interests at risk, while having lasting repercussions for stability in Asia.

Post by:
Topics: Asia • China • Foreign Policy • Japan

soundoff (300 Responses)
  1. J-Man

    I think the US should build a very small base there for troops to have some time off. Maybe always have a few hundred men doing some type of recreation but with a huge stash of arms close by.

    November 26, 2013 at 12:25 pm | Reply
    • Person of Interest

      Go back to playing Call of Duty, kid. The only thing this would do is get us into a war. This would be similar to the Cuban Missile Crisis. There is no strategic this would accomplish.

      "Srategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat."
      -Sun Tzu

      November 26, 2013 at 1:36 pm | Reply
      • lol101010

        Go back to your senior home, and get off my lawn.

        November 26, 2013 at 6:08 pm |
      • j. von hettlingen

        You're right! Robert Caro was on GPS recently and mentioned JFK reading Barbara Tuchman's masterful "The Guns of August". The book described how European powers stumbled into World War One as a result of one little escalation after another. There's risk that small, unintended mistakes made by petty officials in J apan and China involving the manning of the vessels and aircrafts could lead to a big and serious crisis.

        November 27, 2013 at 5:26 am |
      • laughingcat

        to J von Hettlingen – Except WWI wasn't an accident, but an inevitability of the UK long term policy of deliberately blocking German access to the oil resources of the crumbling Ottoman Empire. England made a deal with Serbia to deny Germany rail access to transport oil after Germany negotiated rail line access through the rest of the region. Whatever else precipitated the war, it wasn't a series of "little escalations." While someone assassinated an archduke to set it off, the conflict had already been primed through deliberate UK foreign policy..

        November 27, 2013 at 8:39 am |
    • Poltergiest

      Did you just suggest that we build a "recreational" military base?

      November 26, 2013 at 3:10 pm | Reply
    • katerininburg

      If you really want to irritate China in a quasi military way have a high up US official visit the Yasukuni Shinto Shrine.

      November 26, 2013 at 6:52 pm | Reply
      • HGaddy

        Hey, while we build a base and have men stationed there, how much flying in some women for "COMFORT"? Oh, but no, there has never been any precedent for that.

        November 26, 2013 at 8:44 pm |
    • Bill Rich

      How close do you want this base to be ? There are US bases in Okinawa and Guam already, and US have R&R arrangement in Hong Kong, Philippines, Vietnam. And if US really want to irritate China, US can get a base in Taiwan too.

      November 29, 2013 at 8:47 pm | Reply
  2. J-Man

    For one, I am sick of the Chinese government. If the US shipped manufacturing back to the US or into South America we could solve a number of problems. For example if there were jobs in Mexico, that would slow down illegal immigration. If the US took millions of manufacturing jobs and production out of China that would stop the flow of hundreds of billions or even trillions of US dollars into that country. Bringing back as much manufacturing as possible to the US would also increase tax revenue (from the companies) and tax base (unemployed people can find work). There are so many benefits I don't know why this strategy hasn't already been implemented.

    November 26, 2013 at 12:36 pm | Reply
    • M

      Yes, but the problem with this is that the U.S. government can't just decide that manufacturing will go to this or that country without some pretty tough laws in place to make that happen. The Dept. of Commerce can't simply issue an order directing companies where to have their products manufactured. Congress would need to take up the issue, and I guarantee that every company with a stake in China will flood Washington with lobbyists to oppose such an effort.

      November 26, 2013 at 12:45 pm | Reply
      • ProtectAmericanJobs

        Our economic problems didn't happen overnight. It's been happening over the past 25 years, but the economy was kept going by middle class Americans tapping into the equity on their homes until they were completely tapped out.

        Over the past 2-3 decades both parties have been selling out the bulk of the American citizens, who they're supposed to represent, by allowing the incursion of illegal aliens and the "out-sourcing" floodgates to open wider and wider without taking any sensible measures to stem the tide.

        Our leaders are elected by the Citizens of the United States of America to represent the interests of those citizens and the country itself. They are NOT elected by the Global Market Place or foreign citizens!

        The ONLY REAL FIX for Our Country is to Raise Revenue by Bringing Back Jobs to US Citizens who Pay Income Tax.

        Neither party (Dems or GOP/Tea-whatevers) really matters anymore, because they're not the ones that are really controlling our country. What we really need is for a group of Powerful Patriotic American businessmen (Like Perot was), moneymen and politicians to step up as Americans to take on the World Trade Organization and start turning things around for the good of Our Country and American Citizens. Americans need some of the Americans who are really pulling the strings in this country to start helping their own country and their fellow countrymen, but that'll mean having enough patriotism and guts to start taking on the WTO.

        Perot said it back in 1992 "Jobs getting sucked out of the country" – Many people saw it back then, but unfortunately too many people bought into the spin of "BS" that we were being sold. Seems that both parties were always able to distract and polarize voters with insignificant peripheral issues like gay marriage and abortion, which got most voters so caught up in the BS that they lost sight of the bigger picture.

        We need more Americans, like Perot tried to be, to get some sensible measures put in place to protect America, the American economy and American jobs.

        On the US Department of Commerce's US Census Bureau website there's a graphic showing how our trade imbalance has gotten progressively worse over the entire period from 1989 to the present and how it's really accelerated at an increasely greater rate each year since 1999. We can thank our leaders and the WTO for that.

        See for yourself: www(dot)census(dot)g­ov(slash)foreign-tra­de(slash)balance(sla­sh)c0004(dot)html

        Foreign Lobbyists here in the US promote sending US jobs to countries like China, where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. It also doesn't help us compete when these company's factories are subsidized by China's communist government. Just check out the current Chinese extreme pollution issues – We all live in the same world, but not every country plays by the same rules.

        The bottom line is that "Our Government" has to protect domestic industry and the jobs that those industries provide. If they do that, the rest will take care of itself.

        We need to bring manufacturing back to the United States of America and both parties are ignoring tariffs as a way to level the playing field, raise money and bring jobs back home. Let's guess why. Oh that's right, tariff is a dirty word. Hum, maybe it's that our so called leaders (political leaders) are beholden to the same people who are exporting our jobs.

        I guess we should keep letting Corp Boards, Wall Street, CEOs and Foreign Lobbyists promote sending US jobs to countries where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. How's that been working for us?

        The so called "Global Market Place" is not a level playing field. Companies may have made higher profits by "out sourcing", but they've been putting middle class Americans who are a good part of the world's customer base out of work. I'm not a lefty or member of any union. I run a business that employs over 20 people and produces products that are purchased by customers that do manufacturing and packaging. I'm just an average Joe, but I've been saying this for more than 15 years now. If I can see it, so can our so called leaders (political leaders) who are beholden to the same people who are exporting our jobs.

        And yes – I'm Angry with both parties – As are most American Citizens right now!

        I think it's really important that we start becoming the unsilent majority.

        November 26, 2013 at 1:48 pm |
      • mickdamill

        You're failing to note our desperate need for a trade reform with China. It's nearly a crime against humanity what we allow them to get away with.

        November 26, 2013 at 3:39 pm |
      • Paul

        They should flood Washington with the unemployed.

        November 26, 2013 at 6:15 pm |
      • DH

        @M -Right on! That is exactly the problem. We can't compete with 3rd world slave labor and regulation. Its ok for China to subsidize their businesses, but its a "crime" and "unfair" to place tariffs on imports. To whom? It's unfair to all the American autoworkers who lost their jobs because all the manufacturing was moved to Mexico after NAFTA. Repeal NAFTA and place tariffs on imports based on real life factors such as regulation, workers rights, per capita earnings. It makes it a level playing field. The only ones benefiting in the US are corporations that outsource all their manufacturing. Hey did the price of cars go way down when they cut the expense of paying Americans 20-40 an hour vs Mexicans $3 a day? Seems to me the prices have jumped. That can only mean one thing corporate profits soar. Scary part is I am a staunch conservative, but I am not so greedy I can't look out for my fellow Americans, all those companies do is exploit disenfranchised workers in other countries where their govt encourages them. VERY good analysis of the situation!!!

        November 26, 2013 at 8:12 pm |
      • HereInTheUSA

        I'm in agreement with J-Mam, M, PAJ & DH

        November 26, 2013 at 8:34 pm |
      • gwtheyrn

        @DH Protectionist tariffs don't work.

        November 26, 2013 at 9:50 pm |
    • L-Cole

      J-Man's comments prove that there are so many ignorant idiots on the internet. " If the US shipped manufacturing back to the US or into South America..." US government does not decide where a company should manufacture their products. China, Vietnam, Mexico etc., it's all driven by the labor cost and profit. Actually, by using cheap labor forces, billions and trillions of dollars are flowing back to US.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:05 pm | Reply
      • Self-Sufficient

        You're not the brightest bulb made from a foreign country now are you? If the US stopped doing business with these companies regardless of how much the initial impact would be or how many people are crying on Washington’s doorstep, this would shift everything into our favor as a nation. I know… I know, it sounds crazy but just like most people, as a nation we rely too much on other countries we’ve lost the ability to self-sustain and develop which was what this country was founded on.

        November 26, 2013 at 1:23 pm |
      • ProtectAmericanJobs

        BS – On the US Department of Commerce's US Census Bureau website there's a graphic showing how our trade imbalance has gotten progressively worse over the entire period from 1989 to the present and how it's really accelerated at an increasely greater rate each year since 1999. We can thank our leaders and the WTO for that.

        See for yourself: www(dot)census(dot)g­ov(slash)foreign-tra­de(slash)balance(sla­sh)c0004(dot)html

        November 26, 2013 at 1:46 pm |
      • Person of Interest

        You can not control Private Business interest without Tariffs. You put Tariffs on a country's products they put Tariffs on yours. No country in the world can be self-sufficient without a significant increase to the cost of living or decrease to the standard of living.

        And you are wrong, this country was founded on the principles of freedom. Read your history, a chief complaint was England not granting monopolies to English Companies that essentially prevented private Colonial companies to trade with foreign nations. The USG couldn't and shouldn't prevent private companies from producing goods how they choose (unless of course the private company is producing something for the USG).

        November 26, 2013 at 1:50 pm |
      • Person of Interest

        typo: not granting= granting monopolies

        November 26, 2013 at 1:52 pm |
      • Dupont

        Ironic

        November 26, 2013 at 3:24 pm |
      • Gavin

        You have a choice, a free market or plying companies to manufacture in the US through tariffs. On top of that, if companies were induced through tariffs to manufacture in the US, many would likely move their corporate headquarters to or setup a subsidiary in Singapore or Hong Kong. Then they could recognize their profits at a much lower tax rate and manufacture wherever they wanted. I personally support a free market (with a few exceptions where we can't have the group of losers a free market creates). The only way we can get US manufacturing jobs back is by providing more value than Chinese manufacturers. We won't have lower wages than China, but can we produce more per day or can we produce at a significantly lower defect rate or can we be more flexible so that we handle changes better and customize manufacturing operations very quickly? Until the US manufacturers can prove that they provide more value than China or Vietnam or whatever other economy is growing their manufacturing base, the US manufacturers will continue to be the losers that the free market inevitably creates.

        November 26, 2013 at 3:45 pm |
      • vbscript2

        "If the US stopped doing business with these companies regardless of how much the initial impact would be or how many people are crying on Washington’s doorstep, this would shift everything into our favor as a nation."

        Except for one minor detail: the cost of goods would rise dramatically, thereby greatly reducing the purchasing power of the average American. As much as Americans like to say that we support moving the jobs back here, the vast majority of Americans certainly don't make that a priority when they vote with their wallets. For commodity products where design/production quality doesn't matter much, Americans consumers will buy the $1 product made in China vs. the $5-$10 product made in the U.S. almost every time. Even if it were down to $1 vs. $1.50, consumers would generally buy the foreign product. Even in cases where quality does matter, the products are often designed in the U.S. and then still manufactured overseas. This is the case for the vast majority of microprocessors, for instance. Same for most consumer electronic devices. Final assembly of computers if often done here, though, largely due to shipping costs.

        November 26, 2013 at 5:53 pm |
      • blog7654321

        I understand that companies can have things manufactured in any county. What the US can, and should do, is deny all Chinese made items from entering this country. Sure. Manufacture what you want in China. You just can't bring it here. Another thing, technology (you know the stuff that China steals) is what we are best at making. These technologies, specifically advanced manufacturing plants can decimate the cheap (read slave) labor that China currently uses. Building these facilities, and maintaining them would create many jobs for Americans. We do not need China. And don't even bring up money... you don't want to know.

        November 26, 2013 at 7:10 pm |
      • DH

        @vbscript2. Seriously? Purchasing power is only a result of having a jobs. Not really seeing a huge increase in that department. @Morgan if your so brilliant on "international trade" then how do you explain your theory of economic collapse if all the jobs were brought back? So by your logic a trade deficit is supposed to be sustainable forever? How about a simple lesson in real economics... So you own a business and you bring in 100000 in revenue a month, however expenses that you cannot avoid, are 101000 a month. Is that a sustainable model? You can't keep putting out more than you produce forever. At some point you have to make a profit or you will be out of business. Its a certain economic collapse the way were going. Eventually all the liquid wealth will be shed off to foreign countries. Certainly some benefit from the current trade policies, but that is only a short term gain at the expense of destroying the value of this country. Its not so much that manufacturing jobs are gone that's the real issue, its that all the capital is leaving. Economic principals are the same whether in micro or macro and its not only applies to money, it is a natural law, even our sun will run out of energy some day based on the same principal, it outputs more than it takes in.

        November 26, 2013 at 8:56 pm |
      • Morgan

        L-Cole

        {Actually, by using cheap labor forces, billions and trillions of dollars are flowing back to US]

        Oh? And benifiting who? Surly NOT the Middle Class hard working stiff that has been kicked to the side were devoting 20 years or more of thier life to a company and now is to old to find (or be even considered) for a good paying job

        November 26, 2013 at 9:34 pm |
    • Eric B

      Manufacturing goes to China because the cost of labor is much lower than US. Would any Americans agree to assemble Iphones for $2 an hour? Besides, there are lawyers and workers union scare companies out of US. The government cannot force companies to come back to US. Even they do come back, would anyone want to buy an Iphone for $1000? United States is no longer manufacturing friendly. Find new ways to boost our economy is the first priority for the government.

      Second priority for the government is to lower the US debt. The government's debt has been way over the amount it should be. If the government cannot stop it from increasing, soon the interest will overcome the federal income and we will have a risk to default our debt. Once we default our debt the US dollars will lose its dominate position in the world and US will no longer be the big brother. US is strong because dollars are strong.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:22 pm | Reply
      • ProtectAmericanJobs

        Our economic problems didn't happen overnight. It's been happening over the past 15-20 years, but the economy was kept going by middle class Americans tapping into the equity on their homes until they were completely tapped out.

        It shouldn't be all about Democrats or Republicans! It should be about doing the right thing for our country and the majority of its citizens. I consider myself an independent voter, but going back to the Reagan days and with the only exception having been Perot, I’ve always voted Republican. But all this single-minded, left versus right, ideological one dimensional bull has got to go! This is the problem with our country. It shouldn't be about Democrats or Republicans! It should be about Americans, especially our elected officials, doing the right thing for our country and its citizens.

        Both parties have sold out the bulk of the American citizens, who they're supposed to represent, by allowing the incursion of illegal aliens (cheap labor) and the "out-sourcing" floodgates to open wider and wider without taking any sensible measures to stem the tide.

        Under Clinton jobs to China, Under Bush I & II influx of illegals/cheap labor into the US and jobs to Mexico/NAFTA – Bush started it and it was signed into effect by Clinton. I loved President Reagan because he brought pride and respect back to our country after those embarrassingly weak Carter years, but unfortunately his shortsighted economic policy sent us down the wrong path. Jeez and the wizards on Wall Street wonder why the American people aren't putting as much money into savings and their 401k plans anymore. Maybe it's because the shortsighted economic policies, from the 1980's to the present, have come back to bite the hands that feed them. I guess the thought of changing from a manufacturing based economy to a service based economy of smoke and mirrors is working out just great? Not!

        Our leaders are elected by the Citizens of the United States of America to represent the interests of those citizens and the country itself. They are NOT elected by the Global Market Place or foreign citizens!

        We need our elected officials to Start Protecting American Jobs and do whatever it takes to bring back the jobs they let go. We need leaders who will actually stand up for the American people.

        We need to bring manufacturing back to the United States of America and both parties are ignoring tariffs as a way to level the playing field, raise money and bring jobs back home. Let's guess why. Oh that's right, tariff is a dirty word. Hum, maybe it’s that our so called leaders (political leaders) are beholden to the same people who are exporting our jobs.

        I guess we should keep letting Corp Boards, Wall Street, CEOs and Foreign Lobbyists promote sending US jobs to countries where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. How's that been working for us?

        The so called “Global Market Place” is not a level playing field. Companies may have made higher profits by "out sourcing", but they've been putting middle class Americans who are a good part of the world’s customer base out of work. I’m not a lefty or member of any union. I run a business that employs over 20 people and produces products that are purchased by customers that do manufacturing and packaging. I’m just an average Joe, but I've been saying this for more than 15 years now. If I can see it, so can our so called leaders (political leaders) who are beholden to the same people who are exporting our jobs.

        We need to add tariffs that are proportionate to the inequities in wages and regulations in the country where the goods were produced and or where we’re importing them from. We could then use the money raised by these tariffs to help companies build state of the art manufacturing plants here in the USA, which would create more jobs here at home for US citizens, which would then in turn increase our income tax revenue.

        The people with all of the excuses as to why we can’t, shouldn't or aren’t willing to manufacture products here in the US are the same people who have provided us with the thinking that’s gotten us into this mess in the first place.

        Over the past 15-20 years, I've seen too many of our customer's close manufacturing plants here in the USA and move those plants to different countries, decimating entire areas here in OUR COUNTRY. And I'm not alone. Returning jobs to American Citizens will provide income tax revenue to OUR Government versus our government having to pay unemployment benefits to those who would be jobless instead.

        Bringing manufacturing back to the US not only gives jobs to the US citizens who would be working in those manufacturing facilities, but to the people that would be working in the businesses that would spring up all around them. This should also include the safe harvesting, production and distribution of our own natural energy here in the USA, rather than paying for fuel from countries where they hate us. Let’s keep that money and those jobs here in the US.

        These so-called “free trade agreements” have to go. It was obvious when they were passing these agreements as to what was going to happen and sure enough it did. Our leaders had to have known this as well when they were passing these bills. It’s just common sense.

        On the US Department of Commerce's US Census Bureau website there's a graphic showing how our trade imbalance has gotten progressively worse over the entire period from 1989 to the present and how it's really accelerated at an increasely greater rate each year since 1999. We can thank our leaders and the WTO for that.

        See for yourself: www(dot)census(dot)gov(slash)foreign-trade(slash)balance(slash)c0004(dot)html

        We also need to bring customer support services back to the United States of America and staff them with employees who are US Citizens.

        The “Global Market Place” is not a level playing field! The whole idea of the tariffs is so we can pay our factory workers a decent wage and not be blown out by these other countries where they don’t play by the same rules.

        The bottom line is that “Our Government” has to protect domestic industry and the jobs that those industries provide. If they do that, the rest will take care of itself.

        We may have to pay a bit more for products made here in the USA by US citizens, but at least we'll still have jobs and a future for our children.

        November 26, 2013 at 1:55 pm |
    • Morgan

      no offense but you are absolutely clueless about international economics and how global trade works. Trust me when I say if say you wave a magic wand and all the 'jobs' that used to be here is suddenly transfered back here you would cause a violent economic collapse in the US as well.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:36 pm | Reply
      • vbscript2

        Yep. Consumer purchasing power would plummet, for one thing. As a result, consumers would buy less stuff, which also means retail, administration, and logistics job losses. We'd go into recession overnight.

        November 26, 2013 at 5:55 pm |
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      While our politicians have been bickering for years like idiotic fools, China has been crushing the USA in a war that we don't even know we're in and without even firing a shot.

      Bringing manufacturing back home to the USA is going to end up being not only a key to restoring our economy, but to maintaining our national security as well.

      * Chinese firms and state agencies have been implicated in a host of hacking attacks, on targets ranging from leading industrial and technology firms, to the Pentagon and other US government agencies, to the New York Times, Coca-Cola and numerous other companies and industries.

      * Oct 2012: The U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee said U.S. telecommunications operators should not be allowed do business with China's top network equipment makers because potential Chinese state influence on the companies poses a security threat.

      * Also most counterfeit goods are produced and manufactured in China, making it the counterfeit capital of the world. In fact, the counterfeiting industry accounts for 8% of China's GDP.

      * Foreign Lobbyists here in the US promote sending US jobs to countries like China, where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. It also doesn't help us compete when these company's factories are subsidized by China's communist government. Just check out the current Chinese extreme pollution issues – We all live in the same world, but not every country plays by the same rules.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:42 pm | Reply
    • sfg

      California Senator Diane Feinstein and her husband would not like that idea.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:54 pm | Reply
    • marc

      Why blame china? We did it all to ourselves... we let it happen, heck not only let it, we made it happen. Blaming them is like crying like a baby, there should be no disdain whatsoever on anyone but ourselves.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:59 pm | Reply
      • ProtectAmericanJobs

        I don't blame China – I blame our leaders for selling out the bulk of the American citizens, who they're supposed to represent, by allowing the incursion of illegal aliens (cheap labor) and the "out-sourcing" floodgates to open wider and wider without taking any sensible measures to stem the tide.

        November 26, 2013 at 2:42 pm |
    • krivka

      You are only one of many who want the US to "ship jobs back to the US". What does that mean? The US Government does not own any means of production. The Capitalists are the ones with that power and the Republicans and their minions are their supporters. The question is how those companies can be persuaded to bring the jobs back. There way would be to pay all workers $7.50 an hour. Their supporters, even those who are working class see no problem with that model. The other way is to allow the free market to work and that would mean higher prices, higher wages and higher taxes AND a government run single payer health system that would take the employer off the hook. The best times in the US were when the unions were strong and things were made here., Capitalism worked during that time period.

      November 26, 2013 at 2:36 pm | Reply
      • Jason Glugla

        Put some action behind your words, there are companies making Made in USA clothing and other products which can be found on the internet. Try allamericanclothing or madeinusaforever. Use your money to assert your will, because greed is all the corporate masters know.

        November 26, 2013 at 3:45 pm |
      • bobcat2u

        And your talk of the unions can go either way. Yes, in the beginning when unions were formed, they were needed for the protection of the workers.. The prices vs wages in those days was sustainable. But as the years went by, the union bosses got greedy and started demanding more and more causing a rise in prices which eventually offset the rise in wages. You are soon going to hit a level of demand that the makes a companies profits nil. When that happens, the company is going to do one of two things. close down and put how many ever employees out of work or relocate somewhere where they can make their profits back, which in turn puts those said employees out of work.
        So yes, if the unions had kept their greed under control, they would still be relevant today.

        November 26, 2013 at 5:59 pm |
    • Joe

      How innocent you are!? Have you ever thought that labor price between China and Mexico. And all the resource that US can take advantage from China

      November 26, 2013 at 3:38 pm | Reply
    • Jason Glugla

      It is very simple as to why this hasn't been done. We have a Government of, by and for the corporation. Until the people come to the conclusion that this isn't really the greatest country in the world, nothing will change.

      November 26, 2013 at 3:40 pm | Reply
    • Trevisan Fundador

      That's why we need to tailor a specially bred virus to make a billion Chinese into a few million or so. Tourist agents can visit a few hundred locales, and leave, instead of take, souvenirs. It'd help the trade deficit, too...

      November 26, 2013 at 4:02 pm | Reply
    • Vietnamese American

      I am all for bringing manufacturing jobs back to the USA, but not all jobs. American workers may not want to have dirty filthy heavy-lifting jobs that pay less than $15-20/hour. What we need to do next is to help India, Indonesia, Vietnam and Philippines to have more transparent governments that are capable of building the infrastructures to accommodate the relocation of low-paying jobs from China. Otherwise, we have to continue to depend on China even knowing that we are helping to strengthen the power of the Chinese communists whose intent is to dominate its neighbors first, and eventually the whole world. China has been an imperialistic country for thousands of years, and it is natural for it to go back to its old way of conquering and dominating other people.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:37 pm | Reply
    • Joe The Plumber

      Unfortunately those manufacturing jobs are long gone. The US has not only closed the factories and plants but the majority of the infrastructure that supported those factories (including parts vendors) are gone. The cost to bring back those jobs (if that decision was even reached by the CEOs) would be staggering. Heck, the skills needed to do these jobs are lost and would need to be retrained (yes those jobs are more technical than flipping burgers or saying "Welcome to Walmart"). Maybe jobs will start coming back with more robotics and the costs increasing in these other countries but it will be a slow trickle.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:45 pm | Reply
    • RYANLYNCH. ANCHORAGE ,ALASKA

      YOU JUST HIT THE NAIL IN THE HEAD.GIVE THE JOBS BACK TO THE FELLOW AMERICAN.AND I SUPPORT MADE IN U.S.A

      November 26, 2013 at 5:35 pm | Reply
    • FXXk

      You showed how stupid you are so clear. Idiot, just shut up your stupid mouth please

      November 26, 2013 at 6:16 pm | Reply
    • jesse

      problem is Mexicans aren't as intelligent as the Chinese or any Asian nation for that matter. This is why it hasn't worked yet if ever.

      November 26, 2013 at 6:22 pm | Reply
    • Tjhmax

      As long as companies make a bigger profit with China, nothing will change, no matter how much we like this to change.
      US companies DO NOT have any allegiance to Americans, only to the dollar.

      November 26, 2013 at 6:24 pm | Reply
    • HereInTheUSA

      I'm in agreement with J-Man, M, PAJ & DH

      November 26, 2013 at 8:35 pm | Reply
    • Bill Rich

      Having manufacturing in China, polluting their land, water and air, and slaving Chinese labors in China is not a problem.

      November 29, 2013 at 8:48 pm | Reply
  3. Rob

    Time to work to restore the manufacturing that has gone to China, back to their original western countries. Tough tariff's or other regulatory policies which put Chinese made products at a very distinct disadvantage could perhaps be considered. Make it very expensive for Corporate interests to sell out our western democracies.

    November 26, 2013 at 12:57 pm | Reply
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      I agree 100% – That whole frigging shortsighted Wall Street mentality from the 1980's to the present has been what has destroyed the real American economy and the future of the American people.

      The people with all of the excuses as to why we can’t, shouldn't or aren’t willing to manufacture products here in the US are the same people who have provided us with the thinking that’s gotten us into this mess in the first place.

      We all would've been better off right now if Ross Perot had won in 1992. I and many other people, who were able to see through all of the left vs right BS, did vote for Perot, because he was straight forward and just used common sense. He cared about his country and the American people. (American citizens)

      November 26, 2013 at 1:51 pm | Reply
    • HereInTheUSA

      I agree Rob, we need more people like yourself, J-Mam, M, PAJ & DH to keep speaking out for the American people, because God knows our politicians are not going to do it.

      November 26, 2013 at 8:38 pm | Reply
  4. DL

    I suppose a game of rock/paper/sissors or high card poker wouldn't be an equitable way to resolve the issue?

    November 26, 2013 at 1:08 pm | Reply
    • Dupont

      You forgot Spock

      November 26, 2013 at 3:28 pm | Reply
      • blog7654321

        And lizard.

        November 26, 2013 at 8:50 pm |
  5. Robert

    With this action China has shown the world with out any doubt that it is the big bad guy in the region and a severe threat to world peace. It's time for the US to seriously recognize the situation and take appropriate economic and military policies to respond to the direct imminent threat.

    November 26, 2013 at 1:13 pm | Reply
    • marc

      Maybe you're right, but they haven't invaded and killed 600,000+ innocents on a totally bogus pretext of WMDs half way around the world yet. Well at least the seas they are disputing are close to them unlike when we forcibly took over a recognized independent sovereign nation of Hawaii many thousands of miles away.

      November 26, 2013 at 2:04 pm | Reply
      • Bill Rich

        Obviously, you have not talk to any Koreans about Chinese invasion of Korea in the last thousand years.

        November 29, 2013 at 8:51 pm |
    • think about yourself please

      All the world can have ADIZ but China? Why? Why?

      November 26, 2013 at 3:18 pm | Reply
      • sly

        All the world can have nuclear power except Iran ...

        In other words: America can do anything it wants, and kill hundreds of thousands of women and children for oil, but don't let anyone else in on the secret.

        November 26, 2013 at 3:36 pm |
    • Greg_D

      It's a smart move by China to create a buffer zone against gunboat diplomacy and against stealth weapons. If the U.S. were to really challenge the area, a nuclear war could happen. The U.S. would suffer a far more damaging problem even if both countries were totally destroyed. China is a bunch of individualists living on polluted land with an imploding economy. The U.S. is the Western world as its allies have downgraded their forces so they can no longer defend themselves.

      November 26, 2013 at 7:06 pm | Reply
      • blog7654321

        When you say downgraded forces, think 'there are technologies that exist that make traditional military obsolete'. The US will never release advanced tech. They will remain a myth... I'm not saying that they will not be used, it's just no one will be around to remember them. What happened when the world found out about nukes? Every country with a clue started making them. The same goes here. There are advanced technologies that we can use to defend ourselves if China gets stupid.

        November 26, 2013 at 8:19 pm |
  6. edm49

    Sometimes you wonder if push comes to shove, which flag these American companies would salute?

    November 26, 2013 at 1:22 pm | Reply
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      Great Question.

      November 26, 2013 at 1:58 pm | Reply
  7. Phil

    All those comments have one thing missing that is WHO is second big customer to buy american goods and services. The answer is China not to mention of money lander to America too. Show some maturity people, thinking wisely.

    November 26, 2013 at 1:26 pm | Reply
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      On the US Department of Commerce's US Census Bureau website there's a graphic showing how our trade imbalance has gotten progressively worse over the entire period from 1989 to the present and how it's really accelerated at an increasely greater rate each year since 1999. We can thank our leaders and the WTO for that.

      See for yourself: www(dot)census(dot)g­ov(slash)foreign-tra­de(slash)balance(sla­sh)c0004(dot)html

      Foreign Lobbyists here in the US promote sending US jobs to countries like China, where they work for slave wages, no benefits, no OSHA safety standards or no real environment regulations. It also doesn't help us compete when these company's factories are subsidized by China's communist government. Just check out the current Chinese extreme pollution issues – We all live in the same world, but not every country plays by the same rules.

      The so called “Global Market Place” is not a level playing field. Companies may have made higher profits by "out sourcing", but they've been putting middle class Americans who are a good part of the world’s customer base out of work.

      The bottom line is that "Our Government" has to protect domestic industry and the jobs that those industries provide. If they do that, the rest will take care of itself.

      November 26, 2013 at 2:01 pm | Reply
  8. Person of Interest

    @ ProtectAmericanJobs: I'm sorry if you lost your manufacturing sector job. It won't be coming back for decade(s). Once the chinese people decide to ask for higher wages this will stabalize and you'll see a huge wave back to the US. At this point, salary increases in China have been marginal but on the rise and a few Fortune 500 companies have moved several small facilities back to the US.

    Also, I know of no way to assure 100% of what you buy is American (100%) made anymore. And most of what you can be sure of is more expensive (which could be argued whether it is better quality or if its just easier to produce elsewhere). Either way, the fact remains this is only something that can be accomplished without the US consumer buying American products that were 100% made in the US, which our track record isn't the best.

    November 26, 2013 at 2:02 pm | Reply
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      Actually I run a business that employs over 20 people and produces products that are purchased by customers that do manufacturing and packaging. I’m not a lefty or member of any union. I’m just an average Joe, but I've been saying this for more than 15 years now. If I can see it, so can our so called leaders (political leaders) who are beholden to the same people who are exporting our jobs.

      I consider myself an independent voter, but going back to the Reagan days and with the only exception having been Perot, I’ve always voted Republican. But all this single-minded, left versus right, ideological one dimensional bull has got to go! This is the problem with our country. It shouldn't be about Democrats or Republicans! It should be about Americans, especially our elected officials, doing the right thing for our country and its citizens.

      Over the past 15-20 years, I've seen too many of our customer's close manufacturing plants here in the USA and move those plants to different countries, decimating entire areas here in OUR COUNTRY. And I'm not alone. Returning jobs to American Citizens will provide income tax revenue to OUR Government versus our government having to pay unemployment benefits to those who would be jobless instead.

      Over the last 2-3 decades both parties have sold out the bulk of the American citizens, who they're supposed to represent, by allowing the incursion of illegal aliens (cheap labor) and the "out-sourcing" floodgates to open wider and wider without taking any sensible measures to stem the tide.

      Our leaders are elected by the Citizens of the United States of America to represent the interests of those citizens and the country itself. They are NOT elected by the Global Market Place or foreign citizens!

      The ONLY REAL FIX for Our Country is to Raise Revenue, by Bringing Back Jobs to US Citizens who Pay Income Tax.

      November 26, 2013 at 2:20 pm | Reply
      • Person of Interest

        Repeating rhetoric aside. It isn't our leaders that are outsourcing jobs. It's Big Business/MNCs that do so. Tariffs don't solve the problem. As I stated in another post, you raise tariffs on one thing they raise tariffs on another. So while you may save jobs in one area, you are losing them in another. It's not as simple as tariffs. In the end, responsible business leadership (by patriotic CEOs and owners) and consumer spending is the only real way to reverse this trend. As of yet, this isn't happening on a large scale.

        I agree that our leaders are hardly helping the situation (bailing out large companies and banks that had terrible business practices and procedures, toying with our national credit, sequestration, etc.) but as consumers and business leaders we have the final "check and balance" by purchasing American made items and working with American made suppliers, contractors, and subcontractors. If we can't do that than we are just as much to blame.

        November 26, 2013 at 2:48 pm |
  9. Anony

    Has anyone from CNN read the first two sentences of this article? Not only is the second sentence a non-sequitur ("claims to the contrary"..of what?), but also there are obvious grammatical errors. The quality of writing that manages to get published by CNN always leaves me shocked and horrified.

    November 26, 2013 at 2:42 pm | Reply
  10. MW

    Aside from commenting on the content, I just wanted to say that I thought this was very well written. Nice job.

    November 26, 2013 at 2:58 pm | Reply
  11. desert voice

    "China has consistently opted for escalation over the past 14 months." This indicates stupidity. China seems to be fogetting that the Western Christian wisdom, derived from the Bible and the Tradition, is million times greater than the "human wisdom of Mao and Confucius"! Which is why I fear that the Chinese Communist Party may get itself into a hole from which there is no return!

    November 26, 2013 at 3:10 pm | Reply
  12. Dupont

    China seems to be painting themselves into a corner with their neighbors.

    November 26, 2013 at 3:21 pm | Reply
  13. chrissy

    SPOT ON @ ProtectAmericanJobs on every single one of your posts! And the government needs to implement a plan to start taxing and fining these companies that are sending jobs out of the country! For one thing they are approving child labor in many cases! Now i wanta know....when are YOU running for office? And where can i sign up to work on YOUR campaign??1

    November 26, 2013 at 3:23 pm | Reply
    • ProtectAmericanJobs

      Thanks – But, I have no interest in running for office – Although, I do feel that it's very important that we start becoming the unsilent majority. The are many more of us out there and more still who are just now beginning to smell the coffee.

      November 26, 2013 at 3:30 pm | Reply
      • Leif

        You have the passion and are able to clearly articulate the needs. OK, if you will not represent what you believe in directly, how do you suggest we become the unsilent majority? If not the Dems or the Repubs, then who? How do you suggest that we get the silent not to be silent; do you have any new, effective approaches in mind? Something different from the status quo which is not accomplishing anything? All the right information is out there as you have reiterated... but how to unsilence the silent???

        November 26, 2013 at 6:26 pm |
  14. ProtectAmericanJobs

    Reply to: Person of Interest

    Tariffs don't work if we don't use them. We could have proportionally decreased and monitored them rather than just eliminating them altogether, which just allowed the floodgates to pop wide open. How's that been working for the American people?

    The cold, hard truth is that the unholy alliance between Washington and Wall Street has sold out the American worker and exported our standard of living.

    Driven by the insatiable greed of Wall Street profiteers and accelerated by the false promise of free trade, our manufacturing base has been chased out of this country and along with it the livelihood of millions of hard-working Americans.

    It’s fashionable these days among the politicians, pundits and so-called experts to claim that free trade is actually good for us. They say it enables us to buy cheaper goods made with cheap foreign labor and this, in turn, raises our standard of living.

    The free traders need to ask themselves a more fundamental question: how will Americans buy those goods when they don’t even have a paycheck that covers their mortgage, much less the college tuition for their children?

    We need to bring back Glass-Steagull and start standing up to the WTO.

    If Perot had gotten in we'd be better off today!

    November 26, 2013 at 3:25 pm | Reply
    • Dupont

      I guess you haven't kept up with Perot and his son lately,they are making billions of the NAFTA.(google Ross Perot).

      November 26, 2013 at 3:39 pm | Reply
      • Dupont

        *off*

        November 26, 2013 at 3:41 pm |
    • jonesq

      stop writing you have said the same thing in all your post. it is obvious that your solution won't work

      November 26, 2013 at 7:17 pm | Reply
      • HereInTheUSA

        Bull crap jonesq!

        I agree with PAJ – We need more straight talk and bull from people like you.

        November 26, 2013 at 8:26 pm |
  15. chrissy

    The government needs to implement a taxation plan that makes these corporations realise it is financially better to bring manufacturing back to the states! And when they finish that they need to do an AUDIT OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE! Ive a feeling once THAT is done we will see a whole lot of changes take place in this country!

    November 26, 2013 at 3:31 pm | Reply
  16. sly

    China is just stealing a page from America's book.

    After all – America owns Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, Pakistan and most other nations in the world.

    November 26, 2013 at 3:34 pm | Reply
    • Fr33th1nk3r

      Nope.
      The U.S. has NEVER laid a claim of ownership over foreign lands.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:45 pm | Reply
      • Theohippip

        True, but it HAS overthrown their governments and taken them for its own. Witness as one example the independent monarchy of Hawaii. Not our finest moment.

        November 26, 2013 at 6:46 pm |
  17. Jo

    China is arrogant not only because of its economic success due to cheap labor and pirated copyrights but also because it owns most of the US government bonds, not to mention it dictates the exchange rate for domestic benefits. The government should work on buying the bonds back. A big task considering the financial status of the US budget not to mention the squabbles at Congress. A genius is needed to change the status quo with the world's cooperation to boycott Chinese-made products. China has become a megalomaniac.

    November 26, 2013 at 3:34 pm | Reply
    • Fr33th1nk3r

      3D printing, once the technology matures into a viable consumer product– will spell the end of the Chinese monopoly on cheaply manufactured plastic goods.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:44 pm | Reply
  18. Joey Isotta-Fraschini©

    After much sorrow in many countries, and after much gladness, the laws of supply and demand will guide the world market into balance.
    It is very difficult, and often humbling, for a worker to review what he can realistically charge for what he produces.
    Phrases like "should be" and "used to be" are not operative in the real world.

    November 26, 2013 at 3:37 pm | Reply
  19. saywhat

    While we were engaged in waging senseless proxy wars and exhibiting militarism which the likes of Dwight D.Eisenhour had warned us against, other powers were benefiting from our follies. New centers of power are emerging and moving away from US.
    China & Russia exposed to our weaknesses during Iraq and Afghanistan disasters are now able to stand up to us in geopolitical positioning.
    But do we learn? No. Protecting the interests of an 'ally' remains the corner stone of our foreign policy which puts us at a great and expensive disadvantage.
    Time we review where we stand in the shifting global dynamics.

    November 26, 2013 at 3:49 pm | Reply
  20. jimmy chen

    ADIZ is not big deal at all. According to
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Defense_Identification_Zone_(North_America)

    All civilian planes are required to file flight plans. And All WAR planes probably never did, for US War plans, Russia,
    China.
    Who cares ?

    November 26, 2013 at 4:07 pm | Reply
  21. Robert

    The only good way to solve the American jobs problem would be to put tariffs of constant % on all imports except those from the bordering countries of Canada and Mexico. Then apply an environmental law that follows the "80/20 rule". That means 20% cost to get 80% result. Then reform the legal system to make employers have less risk of lawsuits than in other countries. Then put in a single payer health care system to get rid of all the useless administrative costs associated with the present system. Do not allow unions back as they were a major cause of outsourcing in the past.

    No America can be it's vibrant self again.

    November 26, 2013 at 4:16 pm | Reply
    • Robert

      typo: Now America can be it's vibrant self again.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:22 pm | Reply
    • Joey Isotta-Fraschini©

      I certainly agree with Robert about unions, and the single-payer health care system.

      November 26, 2013 at 4:47 pm | Reply
  22. sam shay

    Please remind me how did Hawaii become part of the U.S. again? The biggest gun calls the shots. If we do not get our act together, it is just a matterof short the20 years, China will rule Asia if not the world.

    November 26, 2013 at 4:52 pm | Reply
  23. amarjeet

    Communist countries and dictatorship have no digestion for good economy and always confine power and pelf to small group of political elite leaving rest of the people on trash can of liberty, freedom, human rights and financial health. There is no independence of judiciary and rule of law as well democratic system. By threatening small neighbors in the form of territorial claims or mineral exploration claims based on passed history of thousands of years when many generations have been born and old history practically gone oblivion, to find ways to consume extra funds and get some out of it by diverting people attention to external threat are ways to keep the masses poor and deprived. China has developed economy but people remain poor and deprived of freedom of expression and freedom of commerce and trade. China just want to open new dispute conduit to divert people attention and resources of people assts.

    November 26, 2013 at 4:57 pm | Reply
  24. rory

    As usual,no body know how to response to the B52 with new policy. US took a big risk and laugh at the Chinese. I hope you have a better luck next time.

    November 26, 2013 at 5:26 pm | Reply
  25. hisgoodteenr

    China with its aggressive imperialistic moves is losing the pr battle.

    November 26, 2013 at 5:35 pm | Reply
  26. hawaiirules

    Obama is a wus, and China knows it. He proved it with Iran, Syria, Lybia. If China takes the islands (or islands in the Philippines, which is another thing they are going after), Obama will do nothing.

    November 26, 2013 at 6:09 pm | Reply
  27. ilovenacky

    そのさきへ -Deep Sky Blue version- でリブログしてコメントを追加:
    Add your thoughts here... (optional)

    November 26, 2013 at 6:33 pm | Reply
  28. PoliticiansRcrooks

    Obama has the Chinese owning a large percentage of our debt he has practically kissed their gludius maximuses while doing cartwheels, he will do ZERO just as he has always done, hell even Iran thinks he's a joke they have him dancing to their fiddle right now on Nukes...

    November 26, 2013 at 6:53 pm | Reply
    • HGaddy

      Yeah, Obama did that. He single-handedly did that. All by himself.

      November 26, 2013 at 8:49 pm | Reply
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