March 2nd, 2014
01:44 PM ET

How U.S. should respond to Russia

By Fareed Zakaria

In a strange act of historical coincidence, it is 60 years ago this week that Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev handed the Crimea over to the Ukraine. It might not have seemed a big deal in those days – everyone was part of one big, unhappy Soviet Union. But that act has created today’s geopolitical crisis.

Russia has now made its move. It has essentially detached Crimea from the Ukrainian government’s control. What remains unclear is what Vladimir Putin wants to do with it. Incorporate it into Russia? Use it as leverage to negotiate a deal with Ukraine? Both?

In any event, Washington’s response should be clear and forceful. Russia has violated all kinds of laws and norms, including most crucially, a treaty that it signed with Ukraine guaranteeing that country’s borders, in return for which Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons.

For Washington, for Americans, for people around the world, it would be a terrible precedent to allow issues like this to be resolved not through diplomacy, but by force. If Russia could detach parts of neighboring countries with impunity, won’t other great powers like China decide that they too can act in such ways?

So what can be done? Well, for starters President Obama should cancel entirely his attendenace at the G-8 summit to be held in Sochi in June. He should try to persuade the other major powers to follow suit. Russia’s membership in the G-8 should be suspended. Remember,  the G-8 was created to recognize that post-Soviet Russia was behaving like an honorable member of the international community, not a rogue state . If the behavior has changed, Russia’s status should also change.

Militarily there is less that can be done. After all, Russia’s military budget is about 18 times that of Ukraine. But NATO should restart talks on providing assurances to countries like Poland – including perhaps building the missile defense system that was abandoned.

In economic terms, Washington and the EU should consider the only sanctions that would be effective: ones targeted specifically at individuals who could be held responsible for these acts of aggression against Ukraine.

Washington cannot do much to stop Vladimir Putin as he creates facts on the ground in Crimea. But step back and consider what a strategic disaster this is for him. Ukraine has slipped out of his orbit and most of the population there is going to be hostile to Russia for generations. Countries like Poland that had eased up relations with Moscow will now view it with great suspicion. All European countries will put their relations with Russia under review. Even China will surely oppose the brazen violation of national sovereignty, something Beijing is always concerned about. Within Russia people have seen that Putin is terrified of a democracy movement and will brutally oppose it, not really the image he wants to present.

So Putin gets Crimea, which is only 60 percent Russian. Parts of it will be deeply hostile to this Russian takeover – including the population of Crimean Tartars, who are Muslim and getting radicalized. Remember, Crimea is in the Northern Caucasus, the area where Russia has been battling a ferocious Muslim insurgency.

So even as he lines up one more piece – or half piece – on his chessboard, Putin will find that the price he has paid for it will be quite high.

Post by:
Topics: Fareed's Take • Russia • Ukraine

soundoff (1,638 Responses)
  1. Justin

    The US should do something because the treaty between Russian and the Ukraine has been violated? The treaty is between them. Let them work it out. Stop this idea that the US is the world police. If we had a treaty with Mexico and Mexico violated it, should Russia get involved? Nope. And they wouldn't. It's only the US that thinks that it must get involved in every single conflict.

    I support our troops in that I believe that they fight for OUR freedom and I want the government to do what they can with our military to protect US. However, I do not support the actions of a government to make decisions that will put our troops in danger for anything else than OUR protection. If the US deploys troops or missiles against Russia, then the US is putting our own safety at risk, not increasing our safety. The troops are our, parents, our brothers, our sisters, our children, and every single one of them matters. The government should use them for our own protection, not in the conflicts of others especially if it puts the homeland at risk.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:13 pm | Reply
    • TNPatriot

      Justin, the treaty is NOT between the Ukraine and Russia, it is between Ukraine and the United States and a handful of other NATO nations. So YES, it is our business.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:32 pm | Reply
      • VietVet69

        It isn't as much the US's business, our business, as it is the EU's business. For years the EU elitists have criticized the US's actions around the world with our military. Let them step up and take their turn and show the US how they would handle it.

        March 2, 2014 at 7:48 pm |
      • Knotty Boy

        "Plans for Ukrainian membership to NATO were shelved by Ukraine following the 2010 Ukrainian presidential election in which Viktor Yanukovych was elected President.[4] President Yanukovych opted to keep Ukraine a non-aligned state."

        March 2, 2014 at 7:59 pm |
      • Brian

        Irrelevant. If you have no cards, you have no business.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:14 pm |
      • jeff

        I am against Russia invaded Ukraine however we must not act like Russia is a piece of cake. after all it is the second most powerful nation militarily speaking so we should be careful on how we react to this stupidity of putin.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:22 pm |
      • Philip

        "In any event, Washington’s response should be clear and forceful. Russia has violated all kinds of laws and norms, including most crucially, a treaty that it signed with Ukraine guaranteeing that country’s borders, in return for which Ukraine gave up its nuclear weapons."
        No, TNPatriot, the treaty mentioned by Zakaria and quoted by Justin, is between Russia and Ukraine so it is none of our business. Besides, our country needs to spend it's money on better educations for our children so that they have better reading comprehension than you do.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:22 pm |
    • Loretta

      Agreed. Let them deal with it. Not our problem. Besides, it was always part of Russia. let em have the lot!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:00 pm | Reply
    • Tony Manero

      The Russians are behaving like the US since the Monroe Doctrine. Just a sample, 1848 Mexican Cession, Nicaragua-Sandinistas, Honduras, Bay of Pigs, etc. and that's not mentioning the South American CIA ventures. Russian invention is troubling, but every 800-lb gorilla gets to play in its back yard.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:04 pm | Reply
    • Andy Ivanov

      Justin,

      The argument you present certainly appeals to reason and is put forth eloquently. However, if you look at our history, very similar arguments were the reason why the US never opposed the Axis until the attack on Pearl Harbor, putting us on the defensive, and very late to a party which resulted in the last World War. Those who forget their history are doomed to repeat it!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:07 pm | Reply
      • Philip

        Andy, the United States did not declare war on Germany, it was Germany that declared war on the United States. The reason we did not declare war was because the German American, Irish American and Italian American citizens of this country were opposed to their country fighting another war on behalf of Britain. Wilson had betrayed his pledge not to enter WW1 and the majority of Americans wanted this country not to take sides again.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:32 pm |
    • Sam

      The U.S. signed a treaty by Bill Clinton (Democrat) so have Obama (Democrat) take care of it.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:08 pm | Reply
      • Tony Manero

        That's correct . . . since war fighting has been outsourced to lower income white, blacks & latinos, they'll die for patriots like you ("that's what the VA is for").

        March 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm |
    • Andy

      The United States and Great Britain also signed the same treaty With Russia and Ukraine. We are also considered to be guarantors of said treaty.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:10 pm | Reply
    • Bob bill

      We also signed that treaty, and the UK....

      March 2, 2014 at 10:45 pm | Reply
  2. donald

    Say what you want but putin is the man, and a smarter man at that.

    Think about it, I always listen to Fareed and he is a genuine genius.
    But putin gets his way, Too many allies are in his favor, gas prices are controlled by Russia to an extent.
    And when this was all boiling up i predicted the exact thing happening now.

    People said this will be a syria or a libya situation (obviously not) if this becomes anything it wont be an easy way for the US to get its feet wet with blood and angering a lot of the world.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:13 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      Putin is nothing but a two-bit thug. The idea that he controls world gas prices is laughable. The US is the world's leading natural gas producer, not Russia.

      All that's needed to keep Ukraine whole is a show of some guts from the west, America in particular. Unfortunately, our current "Jellyfish-In-Chief" appears to have none, and Putin knows it.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:39 pm | Reply
      • johnzbesko

        Please define "show of guts."

        March 2, 2014 at 7:49 pm |
      • VietVet69

        What is needed is a show of guts from Europe. The US has shown plenty of guts for over a decade while the EU criticized. Let them carry the ball this time. We can participate in sanctions but nothing military in any way even if NATO steps in.

        March 2, 2014 at 7:56 pm |
      • readerpan

        I wonder if Bin Laden and Khaddafi think he's a jellyfish...oh wait, they're dead aren't they.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:01 pm |
      • Tony Manero

        Rhetoric from draft deferment patriots like Cheney & Rumsfeld.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:08 pm |
      • Dmusch

        All these Obama haters have short term memory issues. It wasn't that long ago Russia did the same thing in Georgia under Bush II. Wasn't W's claim to fame that he was a war president? Even he was smart enough to realize the US has nothing to gain by opening hostilities with Russia. If anything it would only solidify Putin's stranglehold. Better to let our European allies take point and use this time to build stronger relations with the former Soviet republics who will ave more reason to distrust Putin than ever.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:33 pm |
    • James Luko

      Please read my in depth article regarding this invasion by Russia!

      http://www.nolanchart.com/russia-invades-military-thrust-west

      March 2, 2014 at 7:57 pm | Reply
  3. Samantha

    Why isn't anyone talking about the other side of this move? Everything is about Russia and Crimea- what about the Ukraine regaining its rights to develop nuclear weapons?

    March 2, 2014 at 7:15 pm | Reply
  4. VICMICHELE

    WHY CANT WE ALL JUST GET ALONG......OR SETTLE DIPLOMATICALLY.PEACE OUT...

    March 2, 2014 at 7:19 pm | Reply
    • Mark J Kinchen

      ... because we can't. It's not in our nature.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:33 pm | Reply
    • TheBob

      Because our frontal lobes are too small and our adrenaline glands are too big. We've got another 250,000 years of evolving to do before we are truly rational beings.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:04 pm | Reply
  5. KEVIN

    I don't think Putin is going to pay that high of a price. Good point about the radical muslims. They are running wild in southern Russia. This never makes the news and Russia does not like to talk about it. But these radical muslims are a threat to not only Russia but also Europe. Putin putting down the hammer on them is a smart move but he needs to start doing this in his own country first.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:20 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      The more I think about it, the more convinced I am that Putin isn't going to make a move on eastern Ukraine. As Fareed points out, he's going to have his hands full with the Crimean Tatars, for one thing.

      Also, they had the former US ambassador to Ukraine on TV earlier today and he pointed out that The Crimea and eastern Ukraine are totally different situations. While a strong majority of Crmeans have welcomed this Russian incursion and want to be part of Russia, most eastern Ukrainians, even though they speak Russian, identify with Kiev and not Moscow.

      The Ukrainian defense forces would put up a hell of a fight and so would millions of ordinary Ukrainian citizens. Unlike most other countries in Europe, firearms are plentiful in Ukraine. Trying to invade eastern Ukraine would get very messy for Russia very quickly. If the west can be persuaded to pitch in with air power, then there would be no way Russia could hope to prevail.

      My bet is that Putin will be content with Crimea for the time being and bide his time, counting on the new government in Kiev to fail. But his decision to invade Crimea might well backfire on him in this regard. I'm betting that millions or eastern Ukrainians who until now would have favored closer ties with Moscow rather than Europe might well be re-thinking that position.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:47 pm | Reply
  6. *mikayel

    Tatars and not Tartars

    March 2, 2014 at 7:22 pm | Reply
  7. BRUCE

    We signed the Budapest memorandum. we have no choice

    March 2, 2014 at 7:28 pm | Reply
  8. JANSKOR

    I am not surprised at the aggression of Putin(Russia). Our leader is weak and the world knows it. They know Obama is slow to act, if at all. This would never have happened with any other president because Putin would have feared the consequences. We certainly aren't the world power we used to be and we seem to no longer command respect.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:30 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      I agree completely. I am 54 years old and I have lived through the administrations of 11 presidents. Barack Obama is, without question, the weakest and least respected of the bunch when it comes to international relations. He's even more naive and ineffectual than Jimmy Carter was, and that's not easy to do.

      We have the strongest military in the world by far, the strongest military the world has ever known. Yet dignitaries from other countries have been quoted as saying .. "While we may not have liked Mr. Bush, at this man we just laugh."

      It's pathetic.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:04 pm | Reply
      • Tony Manero

        Rhetoric from draft deferment patriots like Cheney & Rumsfeld.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:06 pm |
  9. Joe

    Fareed, your article resembles that of an undergrad trying to write a paper after a night of binge drinking. If you real analysis on Russian Affairs, read some of my works. Thanks.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:34 pm | Reply
    • readerpan

      Purest hubris. You arrogance does not become you.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm | Reply
  10. DR SAAD RAMZI - CANADA

    very simple 1- attack syria and libertaed by air force, no fly zone and get rid of al asad so to xcriple iran and hizboallah and show russia that usa mean it.....2- help the russian jews and the russian muslioms to criple russia economy by any mean , 3 help israel to attack iran. 4 move usa army and nato army close to russian door and stay in poland , romani goergia etc and prepare the army close to Ukraine boarder .5- close russian embassy from all over the world ask all our allies to do the same and cut diplomatic and economic help and relationship with them, dont allow them to go no where no visa no work .6- un , nato and all europe should help ukraine and cut all economic dealing with russia . hit them in the pocket book.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:34 pm | Reply
    • VietVet69

      I think Canada should have a go at what you suggest. Eh?

      March 2, 2014 at 7:59 pm | Reply
    • hey!

      I am wondering if there is any brain in your head?!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:13 pm | Reply
  11. dr steve ramsey - calgary- alberta

    very simple 1- attack syria and libertaed by air force, no fly zone and get rid of al asad so to criple iran and hizboallah and show russia that usa mean it.....2- help the russian jews and the russian muslioms to criple russia economy by any mean , 3 help israel to attack iran. 4 move usa army and nato army close to russian door and stay in poland , romani goergia etc and prepare the army close to Ukraine boarder .5- close russian embassy from all over the world ask all our allies to do the same and cut diplomatic and economic help and relationship with them, dont allow them to go no where no visa no work .6- un , nato and all europe should help ukraine and cut all economic dealing with russia . hit them in the pocket book. ,.............................

    March 2, 2014 at 7:35 pm | Reply
  12. James

    Our President is being shown how the real world works. His rebuttal is another speach, a wagging the finger. What happened to saying little but carrying a big stick. God bless the people of The Ukraine! I've never bee more ashamed by our leadership then I am now. Community leader maybe. World leader niet!,

    March 2, 2014 at 7:37 pm | Reply
  13. Lisa

    ....Fareed – please stop defending this feekless President who is a laughing stock...more red lines that Putin will laugh at...good lord, as Senator Graham said so well:
    "No. 1, stop going on television and trying to threaten thugs and dictators – it is not your strong suit. Every time the President goes on national television and threatens Putin or someone like Putin, everybody’s eyes roll, including mine,” Graham said.
    "How about this: Suspend Russian membership in the G8 and the G20, at least for a year, starting right now. And for every day they stay in the Crimea, add to the suspension. Do something,” he added.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:38 pm | Reply
  14. upirons

    Might be time for us to start putting the missle defense system in Poland since Putin and Russia was so up in arms about that before. If they are not willing to listen to us then there is no reason for us to wait any longer. Let's see how they like it when we do as we please in that region just as they are doing.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:39 pm | Reply
  15. lean6

    Yeah whatever, Zakaria. What's really important here is...how does Edward Snowden feel about this? I mean afterall...he's part of the undisciplined and selfish political movements in this country that helped to erode the already Bush-weakened stature of our government and the office of the President of the United States. Russia's actions in Ukraine marked a new national holiday in honor of Palin saying "I told you so." Nevermind that it took no stroke of genius on her part, considering what Russia did in Georgia in 2008.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:40 pm | Reply
  16. Craigan

    I think we should go ahead with missile defense wherever it wants regardless of what Russia says or thinks.put I believe we should rethink our position on Syria because Putin and Assad have played there hand,no more diplomacy with Russia,,they no longer have a say in our decision making..oh and I would send 2 aircraft carrierrs to meet theres that is 200 miles off the coast of Florida wake up Obama the cold war is back on,,go get a late,pass.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:44 pm | Reply
  17. Mike

    "For Washington, for Americans, for people around the world, it would be a terrible precedent to allow issues like this to be resolved not through diplomacy, but by force. If Russia could detach parts of neighboring countries with impunity, won’t other great powers like China decide that they too can act in such ways?"

    Are you serious Fareed? The precedent was already set by the United States first in detaching Kosovo from Serbia, then by invading Iraq against international law. Let's not forget the bombing of Libya and Obama's near-march to war last year over Syria. Why are you and key US officials acting as if this hasn't been a part of the US playbook for years?

    March 2, 2014 at 7:47 pm | Reply
    • Juliska

      Completely agree.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:50 pm | Reply
  18. Mike

    How interesting! In 2008, when she was the GOP vice presidential nominee, Palin questioned in a speech whether then-Sen. Barack Obama would have the foreign policy credentials to handle a scenario in which Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine.
    "After the Russian army invaded the nation of Georgia, Senator Obama's reaction was one of indecision and moral equivalence – the kind of response that would only encourage Russia's Putin to invade Ukraine next," she said in Reno, Nevada on October 21, 2008.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:47 pm | Reply
    • lean6

      Dig a little further, genius. She only got that idea because Russia had invaded Georgia on Bush's watch already.

      March 2, 2014 at 7:53 pm | Reply
      • Danram

        Doesn't change the fact that she was absolutely right, does it?

        March 2, 2014 at 8:06 pm |
      • lean6

        Right about what? That Putin would do what he was doing at that very moment? No wonder she's a star in the GOP; you guys are absolutely clueless!

        March 2, 2014 at 8:16 pm |
  19. Juliska

    I really, really don't care.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:48 pm | Reply
  20. Dennis

    Why does the united states have to respond at all ? Russia wants to go bankrupt fighting a war let them.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:48 pm | Reply
  21. Juliska

    Credibility is at stake only if the USA is stupid enough to make it an issue. It has zero impact on the security of the USA.

    March 2, 2014 at 7:54 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      That's exactly what many people in France and Britain said when Hitler moved his 3,000 troops into the Rhineland in 1935.

      "Those who fail to learn from the mistakes of the past are doomed to repeat them."

      March 2, 2014 at 8:08 pm | Reply
      • ug

        The let the French or the limeys worry about it...not our fight...

        March 2, 2014 at 8:19 pm |
      • Dennis

        This is no where near the same thing as Hitler. Let Putin screw around he will eventually fade from history like any other despot.

        March 2, 2014 at 8:42 pm |
  22. Jerry

    Not in the "Northern Caucasus" at all, it is separated from them by the Black Sea. Where did you learn to read a map?

    March 2, 2014 at 8:04 pm | Reply
  23. shraga

    I am surprised that the Russian nation does not revolt against Putin. He bankrupt them all, they live in poverty (aside from a few). He has forcefully been the president and does not plan on stepping down. He is one of those people who thinks he knows best. Just like Hitler who promised his nation glory etc and then after the world and his nation suffered, he took the easy way out. When will the Russian nation wake up? I hope not before it is too late. He bet big on the gas and oil and lossed he bet on Sochi and lossed now he thinks Ukraine is great for his nation but all can see that it will backfire in the end. The people should be out in the streets demanding all the money back from the Sochi contracters. I mean how long can you live in a place with crime, corruption, poverty, KGB like place. When will the people of Russia wake up! Now is the time. The arab nations have done and so did Ukraine!

    March 2, 2014 at 8:05 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      Putin's Russia has basically devolved into a police state, for one thing. Also, most Russians have been thoroughly brainwashed by a lifetime of anti-western propaganda. That's why the Russians keep using the word "fascists" when describing the Ukraine's new pro-western government. It's a trigger word to which their people have been conditioned over the years to respond to.

      But Putin knows full well that if Ukraine's people can overthrow Yanukovich, then his people might just overthrow him some day. That's why he's going to do whatever it takes to make sure that it doesn't stand.

      March 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm | Reply
    • hey!

      why it didn't surprise you when USA went to an unjustified Iraq which left a country destroyed and around 1 million died!? where were you then?!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:20 pm | Reply
      • hey!

        why it didn't surprise you when USA went to an unjustified war in Iraq which left a country destroyed and around 1 million died!? where were you then?!

        March 2, 2014 at 8:21 pm |
    • hey!

      I agree with Sam;

      Covert United States foreign regime change actions

      AKA COUP D'ETATS

      2 During the Cold War
      2.1 Communist states 1944–89
      2.2 Syria 1949
      2.3 Iran 1953
      2.4 Guatemala 1954
      2.5 Tibet 1955–70s
      2.6 Indonesia 1958
      2.7 Cuba 1959
      2.8 Democratic Republic of the Congo 1960–65
      2.9 Iraq 1960–63
      2.10 Dominican Republic 1961
      2.11 South Vietnam 1963
      2.12 Brazil 1964
      2.13 Ghana 1966
      2.14 Chile 1970–73
      2.15 Argentina 1976
      2.16 Afghanistan 1979–89
      2.17 Turkey 1980
      2.18 Poland 1980–81
      2.19 Nicaragua 1981–90
      2.19.1 Destablization through CIA assets
      2.19.2 Arming the Contras
      2.20 Cambodia 1980–95
      2.21 Angola 1980s
      2.22 Philippines 1986

      3 Since the end of the Cold War

      3.1 Iraq 1992–96
      3.2 Afghanistan 2001
      3.3 Venezuela 2002
      3.4 Iraq 2002–03
      3.5 Haiti 2004
      3.6 Gaza Strip 2006–present
      3.7 Somalia 2006–07
      3.8 Iran 2005–present
      3.9 Libya 2011

      March 2, 2014 at 8:24 pm | Reply
  24. Tony Manero

    The Russians are behaving like the US since the Monroe Doctrine. Just a sample, 1848 Mexican Cession, Nicaragua-Sandinistas, Honduras, Bay of Pigs, etc. and that's not mentioning the South American CIA ventures. Russian intervention is troubling, but every 800-lb gorilla gets to play in its back yard.

    March 2, 2014 at 8:05 pm | Reply
    • Danram

      So you wouldn't have had any problem if the US had invaded Cuba?

      Sure, we agreed that we wouldn't do it back in 1962. But Russia also agreed in 1994 to never invade Ukraine, remember?

      March 2, 2014 at 8:13 pm | Reply
    • hey!

      100% agree!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:23 pm | Reply
  25. Juliska

    99% of Americans are more focused on the Oscars...they have just as much impact on my life.

    March 2, 2014 at 8:08 pm | Reply
    • ug

      Speak for yourself...I couldn't care about either one...

      March 2, 2014 at 8:18 pm | Reply
  26. Sam

    Covert United States foreign regime change actions

    AKA COUP D'ETATS

    2 During the Cold War
    2.1 Communist states 1944–89
    2.2 Syria 1949
    2.3 Iran 1953
    2.4 Guatemala 1954
    2.5 Tibet 1955–70s
    2.6 Indonesia 1958
    2.7 Cuba 1959
    2.8 Democratic Republic of the Congo 1960–65
    2.9 Iraq 1960–63
    2.10 Dominican Republic 1961
    2.11 South Vietnam 1963
    2.12 Brazil 1964
    2.13 Ghana 1966
    2.14 Chile 1970–73
    2.15 Argentina 1976
    2.16 Afghanistan 1979–89
    2.17 Turkey 1980
    2.18 Poland 1980–81
    2.19 Nicaragua 1981–90
    2.19.1 Destablization through CIA assets
    2.19.2 Arming the Contras
    2.20 Cambodia 1980–95
    2.21 Angola 1980s
    2.22 Philippines 1986

    3 Since the end of the Cold War

    3.1 Iraq 1992–96
    3.2 Afghanistan 2001
    3.3 Venezuela 2002
    3.4 Iraq 2002–03
    3.5 Haiti 2004
    3.6 Gaza Strip 2006–present
    3.7 Somalia 2006–07
    3.8 Iran 2005–present
    3.9 Libya 2011

    March 2, 2014 at 8:08 pm | Reply
    • ug

      Prove it...

      March 2, 2014 at 8:17 pm | Reply
    • serb

      Amigo u forgot Serbia 1999 and how usa took 20% of serbian land and made this quazzie place called kosovo

      March 2, 2014 at 8:20 pm | Reply
    • hey!

      I agree!

      March 2, 2014 at 8:25 pm | Reply
  27. sunshine

    Fareed Zakaria…. you are a war hawk moron. yeah we should catapult ourselves into a conflict with russia over something happening on the other side of the world in a move that could completely destabilize the entire world and possibly lead to a world war costing millions if not billions of lives. go away. like forever.

    March 2, 2014 at 8:09 pm | Reply
  28. Terry Goldman

    Reall,y Fareed, try to recall some history when you write these things: "If Russia could detach parts of neighboring countries with impunity, won’t other great powers like China decide that they too can act in such ways?" On the contrary, China has already decided that they too can act in such ways and has done so incorporating territories like Tibet with Nepal on the way. "Even China will surely oppose the brazen violation of national sovereignty, something Beijing is always concerned about." China is only concerned and in opposition when someone else is doing it.

    March 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm | Reply
  29. Ejaz Ahmed

    In my opinion, divide the Ukraine in to two parts, East and West Ukraine. Both should have access to waters. Best way to get even with Putin is to support the Syrian rabbles.

    March 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm | Reply
    • ug

      Oh shut up rag head...

      March 2, 2014 at 8:16 pm | Reply
  30. ug

    Oh shut up Zakaria! nobody cares what you have to blab about...

    March 2, 2014 at 8:15 pm | Reply
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