June 9th, 2014
10:32 AM ET

Asia wants insurance, not new Cold War

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

The United States is seeking to deter China from expansion while also attempting to integrate it into the global economy and global order. Even with Russia, the goal is not to force the collapse of the Russian regime (which would not be replaced by a pro-Western liberal democracy), but rather to deter Moscow's aggressive instincts and hope over time that it will evolve along a more cooperative line.

Imagine if the United States were to decide to combat China fully and frontally, building up its naval presence in the Pacific, creating new bases, and adopting a more aggressive and forceful attitude. China would surely respond in a variety of ways, military, political, and economic.

This would alarm almost all the countries in Asia – even the ones worried today about Beijing's assertiveness – because China is their largest trading partner and the key to their economic well-being. What they want from Washington is a kind of emergency insurance policy, not a new Cold War…

…The challenge for Washington, then, is not simple deterrence but deterrence and integration – a sophisticated, complicated task, but the right one.

Watch the video for the full take or read the WaPo column

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Topics: Fareed's Take

soundoff (39 Responses)
  1. Joseph McCarthy

    Asia may want insurance but the right-wing thugs in Washington do want another Cold War. This way, they can further line their pockets!

    June 9, 2014 at 1:56 pm | Reply
    • THORN

      Have to agree with you, much money to be made in military hardware.

      June 9, 2014 at 2:18 pm | Reply
    • Yakobi

      Meanwhile, the left-wing anti-American thugs want this country to be taken over socialists so we can be just and broke and vulnerable as much of Europe.

      June 10, 2014 at 12:31 pm | Reply
      • George patton

        Good grief Yakobi, you sound just like another hateful, lame-brained, right-wing Tea Partier. Are you one?

        June 10, 2014 at 3:22 pm |
      • the REAL George S. Patton

        You sound like a typical America-hating liberal who wants to see this great country taken over either by European socialists or muslim extremists. Quit masquerading as me, you fraud!

        June 10, 2014 at 3:30 pm |
  2. bobcat2u

    Some of the best insurance I've found is Prudential and State Farm. They may want to look into it.

    June 9, 2014 at 2:43 pm | Reply
  3. chri§§y

    Lol @ bobcat! And agree @ Joseph...it appears as though we have this very same conversation nearly every day dont we? Lol

    June 9, 2014 at 2:56 pm | Reply
    • JellyBean

      I see the "This Just In" trolls did not follow you guys here. Good.

      June 10, 2014 at 11:18 am | Reply
  4. Joey Isotta-Fraschini©

    Complicated and sophisticated?
    Yes, all of the USA's chess games are interesting right now. I think that it is foolish to politely abandon power in a game just because tea may soon be served.

    June 9, 2014 at 6:36 pm | Reply
  5. chri§§y

    OMG @ Joey, where? Lol

    June 9, 2014 at 10:06 pm | Reply
  6. let them stew in their own juice

    Asia has pretty much screwed over the entire Western World. They have our jobs. Our world is out of kilter. And we are concerned about their need for us to protect them from a war: cold, hot or just right? Here is a suggestion: let them build a cauldron of their very own making, and then let them stew in it! Think about this simple fact: If Asia erupts into a huge bloody war, ALL our jobs will come flying back to us with lightning speed. Problem solved!

    June 9, 2014 at 11:54 pm | Reply
    • what do we want?

      How about we in the West, start thinking about what WE want! The 0.1% super-rich gave our jobs to Asia. That has wiped out our entire middle-class! How about we start to think about what the 99.9% in the West want. We want our jobs back. Period.

      June 10, 2014 at 12:01 am | Reply
    • just me

      You got it wrong, we screwed ourselves.... the corporate moguls who needed to pump up the stock price for their millions of options farmed it out to Asia to lower cost and increase profits. Now that that has matured, the next step (which they are doing now/have been for about 8-10 years) is downsizing US workforce even more and piling the duties on the poor souls left at the companies.
      So, we have only ourselves to blame... (we let these crooks get away with it)

      June 10, 2014 at 10:17 am | Reply
  7. Joey Isotta-Fraschini©

    Many in the USA are in Denial about why our jobs left.
    The reasons are legion, but the main reason was unrealistic union demands.
    Asia is not the only alternative to American labor.
    However, I agree that the USA should concern itself primarily with what the USA wants, and consider Asian desires only when planning our transactions with Asia.

    June 10, 2014 at 7:07 am | Reply
    • Draco

      No Joey,
      The reason our jobs left was not unrealistic union demands, it was the greed of large company ceo's that saw an opportunity to make billions of dollars by taking advantage of asians who will work for pennies, therefore abandoning the workforce that built our country. Now, the middle class is scrambling to exist, and our country is a mess, all because of the need for the rich to become richer.

      June 10, 2014 at 9:31 am | Reply
  8. Munir Katb

    I wonder if Mr. Zakaria ever thought of advising the US authorities to concentrate on the well-being of the US citizens (Jobs, healthcare, education, etc...) instead of always advising them to carry a bigger stick, which is about to break the back of the US, especially with new giant Yuan-Ruble deals & plans between China & Russia.

    June 10, 2014 at 7:39 am | Reply
  9. orange

    The cold war is an American instigation due to its incessant threats and ringing of Russia with nuclear weapons during the cold war, in a move designed to keep US allies compliant and unquestioning obedience of US diktats while creating economic policies subservient and favorable to US corporations.

    The one side that regrets the end of the cold war is the US, because it misses the influence it once wielded over large tracts of the world, so it is starting to kick-start another.

    Asia is obviously not interested in America's obvious power plays. This time the US has no ideological excuse about "containing communism", so its attempts to "contain" other countries is absurd, especially this time the US is slated to be the weaker party against an ascendant China.

    That should put an end to the neocons' insane dreams about a "god-given" right to invade and attack any country they wish.

    June 10, 2014 at 9:04 am | Reply
    • Yakobi

      You really have no idea what you're talking about. But clearly your education is post-1991, since you don't know what role the Soviet Union played in the Cold War.
      It's sad that people whose freedom to express themselves was achieved through American policy choose to use that freedom to post hateful, untrue things about America.

      June 10, 2014 at 12:27 pm | Reply
    • George patton

      Beautifully put, orange. Nothing could be closer to the truth!!!

      June 10, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Reply
      • the REAL George S. Patton

        Quit masquerading as me, you America-hating fraud!

        June 10, 2014 at 3:28 pm |
      • greg

        i couldn't agree more with you and orange above more, George. I'm sick and tired of all these idiots here taking up for the right-wing thugs in Washington!

        June 11, 2014 at 12:24 am |
  10. marc

    Everything proposed is at a cost to U.S. taxpayers. The allies rarely help fund anything. In case no one has heard, the U.S. is bankrupt. If the Asian countries want to be dependent on China economically but not want to be swallowed up, they're likely on their own to have their cake and eat it too.

    June 10, 2014 at 9:11 am | Reply
  11. Yakobi

    "China would surely respond in a variety of ways, military, political, and economic."
    No, they wouldn't. China is all about the bluff and saving "face". It's a paper tiger. They're more into waiting us out and buying off our politicians than military confrontation, which they know they'd lose at.
    The more freedom and money its people receive, the more they'll demand their government become more like South Korea.

    June 10, 2014 at 12:21 pm | Reply
    • sly

      "military confrontation"? With China?

      Some of y'all are brilliant. Yeah, I'm sure China and Russia and the US are heading for a all out nuclear war ... yeah right ... what an idiot. These 3 nations would NEVER go to war – they run the world.

      Right wing domestic terrorists pose a far more dangerous threat to Americans than Russia and China combined.

      June 10, 2014 at 2:34 pm | Reply
  12. chri§§y

    Exactly @ Draco! But of course the 1% will shift the blame on working americans! Otherwise they might have to admit it was because they are just greedy b@5t@rds!

    June 10, 2014 at 1:18 pm | Reply
  13. chri§§y

    Lol @ jelly bean, sorry to break it to you but yea they did follow us here.

    June 10, 2014 at 1:24 pm | Reply
  14. Big Jilm

    Yeah, except the majority of the off-shored jobs were not unionized to begin with, but nice try.

    Outsourcing is ideal for the 'cattle barons' as they don't have to worry about any safety regulations, can work people ridiculous hours, and pay them next to nothing. Even if small town Ohio workers in a given factory have no way to compete with that, union or not ...and no amount of tax freedom can compete with that.

    Judas preaching "patriotism" while selling us all out. This isn't a political thing, either. It's straight-up greed.

    June 10, 2014 at 3:27 pm | Reply
  15. anteloptim

    I wonder if this is actually considered journalism. Spend 5 minutes, write down some 2 paragraph exercise in logic, post it on cnn and presumably get paid for it.

    My 8th grader did a weekly assignment in history a few days ago, equally as long, with just as much research......and got 5 points out of a possible 5 points. I wonder if he is posting his child's 8th grade homework assignment.

    June 10, 2014 at 3:39 pm | Reply
  16. chri§§y

    Spot on @ Big Jilm! And the union jobs are still here in fact! How does one explain that if its their fault? Lol

    June 10, 2014 at 6:51 pm | Reply
  17. chri§§y

    You mean "all the thugs" in washington dont you? Because being a thug is non discriminatory as far as party affiliation! They come in all shapes and sizes...all colors and ALL political parties as well!

    June 11, 2014 at 12:49 am | Reply
  18. HONG KONG

    The West should get at least Hong Kong back. Do not be fooled Asia is stronger than USA. Washington DC can not afford emergency insurance policy.

    June 11, 2014 at 3:58 am | Reply
  19. MS

    The nations that are in proximity to China are all potentially just a day or two away from being declared a renegade province. China's leadership has shown that it will use force to further it economic goals, rather than trade, if it can get away with it. Our Asian alliance needs to beef up their own defenses, but China's leaders also need to know that an overt act of war may trigger a war with the US as well. Without that deterrence we'll see more Tibet like actions and more cases of Chinese warships invading neighboring territorial and economic exclusion zone waters. It isn't a matter of choice, unless we want to see open war in Asia and all of the economic ramifications that would bring. Being weak and acting weak invites military adventurism, being strong and projecting strength helps avoid actual wars. We saw that in Europe—the cold war was a success.

    June 11, 2014 at 12:16 pm | Reply
    • greg

      Is this why we jumped into Vietnam back in the 1960's, MS? We'd better look at our own policies before criticizing others, don't you think?

      June 11, 2014 at 1:02 pm | Reply
  20. james

    china is securing territories in Asia because it needs to secure steady source of natural gas and marine resources and it knows that the US will not seriously move to deter chinas expansionary move, and besides China knows that the US is dependent on china and that US economy will collapse without china. China believes that US will not make serious moves to contain china and this worries other US allies in Asia.

    June 12, 2014 at 12:13 pm | Reply
  21. albert

    China is now the no 1 emerging power in the world and is just reclaiming its territories. US cannot do anything about giving insurance to asia because its own economy is in shambles and its influence declining. We are now seeing the demise of US power and the ascendancy of Chinas military and economic power. Asian countries better cooperate with china.

    June 12, 2014 at 12:33 pm | Reply
  22. yoonyoungjo

    I tend to usually agree with Zakaria. And overall I agree with his sentiment here. But at what point do you draw a line? Or should there even be a line? Lets use an example of a next door neighbor. Of course you want your neighborhood to be in sync and harmony. Maybe a neighbor that lets their dog poop on your lawn and doesn't pick it up, shouldn't be made into a big deal. Maybe your neighbor parks their car in front of your drive way, and you keep asking them to stop and they do sometimes, and they don't sometimes. Maybe your neighbor starts going into your garage whenever its open and starts taking tools and other knick knacks from your garage. Where do you draw the line? Where do you say, harmony and integration isn't just one side letting things go and letting the other side doing whatever they want, but instead is a two way street. Perhaps I am not the best judge of that answer but I think the world can be compared to a large neighborhood. At some point some standards and acceptable behavior has to be normalized. Otherwise you are going to have a world where the wealthy and 1% have a massive power grab and the 99% will be the ones who pay the heaviest cost.

    June 14, 2014 at 3:12 pm | Reply

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