Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues
July 9th, 2014
04:20 PM ET

Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

From Syria to Iraq to the fast deteriorating situation in Gaza, the prospects for stability in the Middle East are looking increasingly bleak. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has also had to contend with a newly assertive Russia, a rising China and a persistent threat from militant groups such as al Qaeda.

To help make sense of these challenges, understand what to look out for next, and to assess where U.S. foreign policy has gotten it right – and wrong – GPS host Fareed Zakaria will be answering readers’ questions on recent developments across the globe.

Please leave your questions for Fareed in the comments section below.

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Topics: Foreign Policy • GPS Show • United States

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soundoff (95 Responses)
  1. Shoaib Ahmed

    Hello Fareed,
    America's foreign policy has concentrated on Muslim countries where it feels terrorists are produced. Do you think it would do America much good to take a backseat in instructing others in their affairs and take into account the increasing extremist traits budding in the American society manifested in the events like Colorado shootings? Do you think extremist thought process has effectively permeated the American society and the situation has reached the alarming levels?
    Thanks

    July 10, 2014 at 9:43 am | Reply
  2. StanCalif

    Your CNN posted this story on its home page today: World Cup final: Whose side is God on?
    I find this completely irresponsible! Have we learned nothing from the Muslim vs Muslim wars? Now CNN seeks to agitate for a Catholic vs Catholic struggle? DON'T tinker with religion!!! Tell your CNN hosts to remove this story immediately. It is irresponsible and highly offensive!

    July 10, 2014 at 9:58 am | Reply
    • banasy©

      It's a fluff piece.
      Good gravy. Settle down.

      July 10, 2014 at 3:47 pm | Reply
    • Pro-active

      Many understand that those postings about the World Cup final and the two Popes were in the lighter mood and the spirit of the occasion/game. Relax, unwind and laugh it off. the World is already a very sad place with all the conflicts and wars going on, not to talk of the poverty and retrogression.

      July 13, 2014 at 8:17 am | Reply
  3. Yi

    I come from China. Many Chinese believe if U.S. can stop interfering foreign affairs , the world will be a better one. I don't believe it. I think if U.S. stop doing so, the world war three will be on the way. But I can't convince them either .How do you think about this?

    July 10, 2014 at 10:52 am | Reply
  4. Howard Marx

    Fareed,

    I am an avid viewer of GPS as well as a follower on twitter.

    Question to research:

    We know the latest recession has not been a cyclical one, but a structural one. It would be interesting to know to what extent has the offshoring and outsourcing of not only manufacturing jobs, but also service jobs been a factor. The service jobs that are being off shored are the jobs that graduates used to take in order to grow their career.

    Thanks,

    Howard

    July 10, 2014 at 11:01 am | Reply
  5. metricpioneer

    Fareed. You complain about American Exceptionalism, giving examples like the refusal of most Americans to adopt SI (International System of units, known to Americans as Metric System) yet during your show, you hypocritically cling to obsolete measures like mile and foot and Fahrenheit and pound instead of kilometer and meter and Celsius and kilogram. You should be helping America kill the inch instead of perpetuating this American measurement train wreck. Why do you refuse to practice what you preach?

    July 10, 2014 at 11:05 am | Reply
  6. David Allen-Smith

    Fareed,
    Given the recent poll of Muslim-majority countries by the Pew Research Center, that Muslims are increasingly opposing extremism, what remains the driving force behind recruiting for the extremist's cause? That these extremists indiscriminately attack, in so many different parts of the world, most anyone with different religious and political views, including fellow Muslims, it seems like an almost rabid type of disease. Is it poverty, lack of opportunity, coercion, or simply that the leaders are charismatic and cherry pick and hijack the words of the Prophet Mohammad in the same vein whereby Adolph Hitler and Jim Jones used religion to fuel recruitment?

    Is there a way we can, as a world society, remove some of the reasons, incentives and influences for joining these extremists? Would you agree that when this is all over, however many years into the future that takes, that history will look at these as the dark days of Islam?

    July 10, 2014 at 11:16 am | Reply
    • Pro-active

      I think Islam is going through what Christianity went through thousands of years ago. These are difficult times but of course, education, awareness and the right type of Leadership and Direction is what will influence events and make people change course. I agree with your reasoning and the factors at play.

      July 13, 2014 at 8:23 am | Reply
    • alan

      I can make a similar argument about Israel's killings and covert ops and called "dark decades of Judaism." To do that we need a free media in America. Right now the Jews own the media in USA .

      September 23, 2014 at 11:24 am | Reply
  7. Shahrukh

    Gentrification in places like Brooklyn and Edinburgh is not necessarily making neighborhoods better. It usually just pushes the problems into other parts of the city. What can be done to accommodate both older, poorer residents, and incoming wealthier ones?

    July 10, 2014 at 11:31 am | Reply
  8. iblis archie, India

    What is Israeli occupied territory to the south of Canada should do to end Israeli terrorism against Gaza?

    July 10, 2014 at 11:35 am | Reply
  9. BryanPayor

    Dr. Zakaria
    One of the consequences of the US invasion of Afghanistan that garners relatively little attention is the resulting influx of heroin production and distribution, for which Mozambique has become a major springboard. While this is a problem for many reasons (not the least of which is the drug trade's potentially destabilizing effect on Mozambican society), I'm curious as to how this affects the US relations with Mozambique in particular and Africa in general. The US military and governmental aid groups play an active role in the nation's development, but I am skeptical about the effectiveness of the methods being used; particularly on the military end, where operation aims are either narrowed to training unfit Mozambican army personnel or small scale medical relief in desperate areas of the nation. Is this a problem that Western and South African nations (to whom the drug sales are ultimately aimed at) can help solve or will this fall on the Mozambican people to settle?

    Thank You,

    Bryan

    July 10, 2014 at 11:41 am | Reply
  10. b ward

    Is religion, through intolerance, ignorance, and black or white beliefs, the root cause of violence in the Middle East specifically and the world generally?

    July 10, 2014 at 12:13 pm | Reply
  11. McPoyle

    Why are self-proclaimed experts like Cheney, Wolfowitz, Kristol, Bret Stephens and other neocons, who are repeatedly wrong about everything they opine about (Iraq), still given a platform on TV to continue to bloviate about world affairs? Why is their empty analysis still taken seriously and presented as news and discussed on your show and network? They are not experts, they are professional trolls. Giving them the significance they don't merit just breathes more life into them. Will you pledge to ignore these people and let them fade away into insignificance and focus more on the real exists who actually make correct calls?

    July 10, 2014 at 1:17 pm | Reply
    • Lisalyn

      Fareed can't very well blackball people who were vocal proponents of and advocates for the 2003 Invasion of Iraq because he was one of those people himself! At least he has acknowledged his (very high cost) mistake and broken with the neocon hawks.

      July 12, 2014 at 1:50 am | Reply
  12. Aseem

    Why does America have such blind support for Israel? Is it money related? Is it just strategic to have a reliable ally in the Middle East? Is it because of very influential Israeli-Americans? Is it some kind of unwritten prerequisite to run for political office in the US? Or is there a larger, less obvious, reason behind it?

    I've heard answers to these questions before, but I would greatly appreciate your perspective on this.

    July 10, 2014 at 2:18 pm | Reply
  13. jgreen52013

    President Obama/Council of Economic Advisers:

    The late Peter Drucker advocated that no CEO’s salary should be greater than 20 times that of their lowest paid employee.

    Switzerland recently expanded on this concept, but would limit the CEO’s salary to no more than 12 times that of the lowest paid employee.

    Naysayers waved and flailed their arms in objection under the “free market” concept, claiming that a CEO’s salary should be solely the province of the Market, i.e., determined by the Market, and that artificially setting a CEO’s salary would result in a “brain-drain”—which also assumes, among other things, that a CEO would always opt for the higher salary….[is driven solely by GREED]….

    And, of course, given that it became law, as proposed by Switzerland—i.e., theoretically universal law—where would they go?

    The larger point, here, is the “free market” concept—i.e., what we currently “believe”, is solely the province of the Market [sacred ground]—even when this “belief” is detrimental to the Market….

    For instance, the most pernicious belief in America, today–indeed, throughout the OECD is the belief that:

    “The market can provide anybody wanting a job, with a job”….

    For one, this has never been true [with our Welfare system in America, alone, as consummate proof]….

    But since the mid-1970’s, when the world economy underwent a major paradigm shift—the Market has been less and less capable of creating enough jobs—

    And given “automation”, alone—going forward into the 21st Century the Market creating enough jobs is becoming exponentially less and less true, daily….

    And yet, to this day, our policy makers stand on one foot and then the other….as year after year goes by in a resulting sluggish recovery—entrenched in the “belief” that the Market will create all the jobs we need…..if we just wait long enough…..[and based on a specious “free market” argument]…..

    Also ignored, is that the Market thrives when we have a robust, employed, consuming workforce….

    The over-arching point is that the Market is INCAPABLE of creating enough jobs in our 21st Century economy—and the “belief”, above, is preventing us from finding a solution to pervasive unemployment in America.

    Please see Pro-Market, deficit-neutral: HR 1000/THE NEIGHBOR-TO-NEIGHBOR JOB CREATION ACT, Amazon/Kindle

    Jim Green, Democrat opponent to Lamar Smith, Congress, 2000

    July 10, 2014 at 2:37 pm | Reply
  14. chri§§y

    Ty @ jgreen! Many of us do realise what you have just posted, to be fact, but there are some here regularly that refuse to believe this. Hopefully now they will read up more on this. But even if they dont it is refreshing to know that im not alone in my belief! Ty again.

    July 10, 2014 at 2:52 pm | Reply
  15. Joel J

    As the Millenium Development Goal deadline approaches next year, much progress has been made in poverty reduction and health. How much did the United Nations actually contribute to the improvement of lives in the developing world, and how much would have happened anyway due to economic and technological development?

    July 10, 2014 at 7:30 pm | Reply
  16. Alberto G.

    Something media manipulation like CNN will not speak about.
    http://foodrevolution.org/blog/el-salvador-aid-gmo-seeds/

    July 10, 2014 at 8:10 pm | Reply
  17. Karrell Hickman

    Why does Britain allow the implementation of Sharia law in specific neighborhoods in their cities?

    July 11, 2014 at 10:13 am | Reply
  18. Timmy Suckle "The Medical Cartel Puppet"

    I kissed my way up to CEO at a health insurance company. Now I take over $1,000,000 of your health care dollars for NO VALUE ADDED to your health care. And that’s just me. Now think about how many other CEOs, VPs, Directors, Managers, etc. are at my company alone. Now multiply that by thousands of others at hundreds of other health insurance companies. From 10 to 25% of your health care dollars go towards administration that adds NO VALUE to your health care. But my company’s PAC dollars will continue to fool you little people into thinking that a single payer system will be bad. Little people like you are so easy to fool. Little people also don’t realize that a single payer system is the ONLY system that would allow little people (as an entire country) to negotiate better health care prices. Little people don’t realize that the Medical Cartels already know that. And that is the reason why the Medical Cartels spend so much PAC money from the hospitals and doctors lobbying against a single payer system. Some little people say that a single payer system would cost you little people more. But if that were true, then wouldn’t the hospitals and doctors WANT that extra money? Yes they would. So why do the Medical Cartels lobby against a single payer system? It’s because the Medical Cartels know it would allow little people to negotiate better health care prices. And that’s what the Medical Cartels are afraid of. Period.
    But us big wigs at insurance companies, hospitals, and pharmacy companies don’t ever need to worry about health care no matter what it costs. We get our health care paid for one way or another by you little people. And we get the little people that work at our companies to contribute to our PACs. And us big wigs say it’s to protect the little peoples’ jobs. But in reality it would be in the little peoples’ best interest to NOT contribute to the PAC. Again, little people are so easily fooled. I won’t ever have to worry about losing my job with so many little people being brain washed by the Medical Cartels’ PAC money. Not only that, the Medical Cartels’ PAC money is used to elect so many republicans that will never allow a single payer system. Republicans have always fought against any meaningful health care reform. But that’s what our Medical Cartels’ PACs pay them for. Politicians can be bought so easily.
    Pretty soon the only people that will be able to afford health care is us big wigs. And that’s the way it should be. We don’t want you little people using up the resources when we need them. And once again, I thank you little people for capping my SS tax at the $117,000 level. Now I only pay 1.17% SS tax and you little people pay 6.2%. Also, thank you for extending my tax breaks. I’m using the extra money on my vacation houses.

    July 11, 2014 at 1:54 pm | Reply
  19. Ray Watson

    Fareed,
    I have read on many international web sites, and one US based creditable site, Aviation Week, http://aviationweek.com/defense/commentary-do-russian-radar-developments-challenge-stealth. That the Russia and Chinese have radar that can detect our stealth airplanes, F-22, F-35 and B-2 bombers. It has to do with the Russian radars using VHF waves in their radars. I have not read this or anything related to it in any major western based newspaper or web site.

    Is this true, and I would think any independent news site would find this a interest subject and would report on it?

    July 11, 2014 at 5:27 pm | Reply
  20. Michael

    Fareed, I feel that President Obama has gone too far into "it's Iraq's problem now" when it comes to the ISIS crises. I do not believe we should have essentially attacked and destroyed Iraq. However, our government helped create this power vacuum in the region and we should no a moral or ethical or even practical basis go ahead and assist the Iraqi government by at least engaging the ISIS through air strikes and help slow down their advances – hopefully long enough to get regional governments to re-take control of certain areas. If we do not, we will have a much larger crises on our hands. We need a NATO resolution and we need to get some of our allies involved, but we ought to do this right away. Do you agree that we ought to engage ISIS for both security reasons as well as for humanitarian reasons. We have engaged other conflicts based on far less threats.

    July 12, 2014 at 1:47 pm | Reply
  21. Linda Cahn

    Mr. Zakariah,
    Your analysis about Syria appears right no target. On israel, I fear you miss badly. Netanyahu is not caving in to "right wing pressures." Virtually the whole country is behind his actions. How could they not be? They have had more than 500 missiles raining down on them in less than a week.
    JFK almost brought America to the edge of a nuclear war when Russia placed missiles near our border. Do you think any leader of a nation would allow missiles to rain down, with or without an Iron Dome protection, without acting to stop them?
    And having relinquished control over Gaza in 2005 – under the promise that it would remain demilitarized – only to find it filled with 10,000 missiles that could destroy sovereignty Israel but for Iron Dome, do you really think any leader of Israel would now relinquish the West Bank?
    You should be sophisticated enough to know that sometimes there are no "solutions" to immense world problems. There is only choosing the best of a lot of bad alternatives. Right now, the Israelis only choice is to ensure their survival, which means taking out as many missiles as they can, and trying to prevent the immediate re-stockpiling of those missiles by surrounding Gaza on all sides.

    July 12, 2014 at 10:29 pm | Reply
  22. Pro-active

    Thank you Fareed. My question is:

    Why is the US pursuing the same failed Foreign Policies of old and mainly Republican old fashioned ideas (of brutal force & I know better what's good for you lot) that has failed the Country? Especially, advocating for Regime Change in places and Countries where they do not understand the various complexities at play?

    July 13, 2014 at 8:30 am | Reply
  23. Carl Leonard

    Fareed: A story exercise that, I believe would result in a news worthy segment, would be a poll of the Silent Generation and the Baby Boomers . The poll would be to count the jobs where they received $$ in return for their work, which no longer exist.

    July 13, 2014 at 12:48 pm | Reply
  24. MP Singh

    Freed, the parallel quoted by the Swedish Foreign Minister between the annexation of Kuwait by Saddam Hussein and the joining of Crimea to Russia is incorrect. Saddam Hussein invaded and forcibly and illegally annexed Kuwait, while Crimea legally, through a national referendum, voluntarily joined Russia. These are two different stories, there is no parallel at all. The Swedish Foreign Minister also groused that while international community took action to liberate Kuwait, nothing was done in the case of Crimea. I am afraid the Swedish FM, ignoring the historical reality, made wrong comparison; Crimea is part of Russia, nothing can be done to reverse this position. I also noted that you praised the Swedish FM for his "parallel" and his stand on the issue.

    July 13, 2014 at 2:38 pm | Reply
  25. Richard Williams

    I would like to know why CNN's reporting fails to elaborate on the huge disparity in the respective casualties of the two sides in the on-going Palestinian – Israeli conflict....?!
    CNN reports on the number of missiles fired by the Palestinians – but not on the results in the form of Israeli casualties. These casualties are relatively low or non-existant due to the Israeli "Iron Dome" missile defense system largely paid for by the US. Though CNN has made an effort to show the consequences, in the form of civilian casualties, of certain Israeli air strikes on the Palestinians, your credibility with an international audience will continue to suffer when you neglect to present the consequences of this violence in a balanced and honest way. In your reporting, it would be appropriate to highlight the Palestinians' lack of their own "Iron Dome" to protect them....while, ironically, the White House portrays the Palestinians as an evil force which threatens Israel with its impotent missiles.

    July 14, 2014 at 3:13 pm | Reply
  26. metricpioneer

    Fareed. I think you should do a segment on the desperate need for measurement reform in the United States, which should adopt the International System just like all the grown-up nations. We really need to kill the inch already, I mean really, how many inches are in seven yards? How many yards are in seven miles? With centimeters, meters and kilometers, one simply moves the decimal place to get the answer.

    February 14, 2015 at 8:05 pm | Reply
  27. metricpioneer

    Your Book of the Week should be: World in the Balance: The Historic Quest for an Absolute System of Measurement Hardcover – October 24, 2011
    by Robert P. Crease (Author)
    ISBN-13: 978-0393072983 ISBN-10: 0393072983

    February 16, 2015 at 2:06 pm | Reply
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