Why Turkey needs to take ISIS threat seriously
October 31st, 2014
01:10 PM ET

Why Turkey needs to take ISIS threat seriously

Aki Peritz and Joshua W. Walker, Special to CNN

Aki Peritz is a former CIA counterterrorism analyst and coauthor of Find, Fix, Finish: Inside the Counterterrorism Campaigns that Killed bin Laden and Devastated Al Qaeda. You can follow him @akiperitz. Joshua W. Walker is a Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and a fellow at the Truman National Security Project. He previously served as a senior advisor to the U.S. Department of State. The views expressed are their own.

The beleaguered Kurds, fighting a desperate battle against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in Kobane, Syria, are finally receiving reinforcements. A small contingent of Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga are reportedly crossing Turkey to help defend their ethnic compatriots battle this existential threat.

But Turkey’s leaders are probably not thrilled with their reluctant decision to let Iraqi Kurds join the fight in Syria. Indeed, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan earlier this month made his feelings about fighting ISIS crystal clear. “For us,” Ergodan reportedly said, “the [Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK] is the same as ISIL (ISIS). It is wrong to consider them as different from each other."

While this might make sense from a Turkish-nationalist perspective – after all, Turkey has been fighting the PKK for over a generation – this suggests incredible short-sightedness on Ankara’s part. Turkey must place a far higher priority on fighting ISIS because the group, with its global ambitions, poses a far greater threat to the integrity of the Turkish state than a Kurdish Marxist organization ever will.

Indeed, for a group seeking to fulfill its religious destiny, ISIS’s covetous eyes aren’t on places like New York City, London, Beijing or Los Angeles. Rather, they are on places of real significance in the Islamic world, like Mecca, Jerusalem…and Istanbul. And lest Turks think they are not in ISIS’s future crosshairs, it’s important to remember that the founder of ISIS’s predecessor group, al Qaeda in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, had a keen interest in striking Turkey.

But even if Kobane does not ultimately fall to ISIS, Turkey still shares the longest border with the group, perhaps the first time any NATO ally is within sight of a terrorist organization without doing anything. ISIS is not expending so much effort to take Kobane merely to fight the Kurds; rather it is to consolidate its gains along the Turkish border to carve out a viable political entity.

Turkey likes to blame NATO and the U.S. in particular for the metastasizing conflict in Syria, and surely they deserve some of the blame. But Turkey is equally responsible for the way things have turned out on their border, given its exclusive focus on defeating Bashar al-Assad at any cost.

Erdogan claimed, “Foreign fighters have never entered Syria from our country. They may come to our country as tourists and cross into Syria, but no one can say that they cross in with their arms.” He’s technically right, of course; folks don’t arrive at Istanbul Ataturk Airport from Tunis or Brussels with duffelbags full of AK47s and RPGs. Instead, they get their arms and training south of the border.

We’ve seen how this movie can play out before. Following the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003, Damascus turned a blind eye to the fanatical foreigners who were transiting their territory to fight the Americans. It was such a concern that in 2007, Sen. Joe Lieberman seriously considered proposing legislation to sanction Damascus International Airport for its part in cycling foreign fighters into the Iraq conflict. But besides transiting through, these terror networks set down roots in Syria, so when that country began to unravel a few years ago, these links between smugglers, financiers, ideologues and military operatives could be reactivated for something closer to home.

ISIS’ “Jihadi Highway” clearly runs through Turkish soil. Why else would Ankara claim that they’ve already deported some 1,100 people trying to transit to Syria via Turkey? And beyond the thousand or so Turkish nationals now fighting in Syria, anecdotal evidence keeps piling up: two female Austrian teenagers arrived in Syria via Turkey. The 140+ Dutch fighters in Syria transited through Turkey. And the list goes on and on. And unfortunately for Ankara, highways run both ways.

To be sure, the Turks are doing much in the region – they are hosting over 1.6 million Syrian refugees. They are now allowing the United States to fly drones (but not manned aircraft) from Turkish bases. And since the PKK and ISIS are fighting each other on the Turkish border, some in Ankara might be tricked into agreeing with that shopworn Middle Eastern phrase, “the enemy of my enemy is my friend.” Or, at least not my enemy.

But Turkey’s recent bombing of the PKK sites within its borders combined with Ankara’s reported decision to skip the meeting where 22 other nations are coordinating an anti-ISIS military response with the U.S. are troubling on many levels. Thinking ISIS is a lesser threat than the PKK suggests a fundamental miscalculation on Erdogan’s part. The PKK’s leader sits in a Turkish prison working with Ankara towards an ultimate Kurdish-Turkish reconciliation from which both sides will benefit.

Furthermore, an ISIS nation that runs for hundreds of miles along Turkey’s border would become Erdogan’s lasting legacy, no matter how well the Turkish economy does in the future or how well his party performs at the polls. This festering sore will always be a regional problem. ISIS’s appeal to disenfranchised Sunnis across the Muslim world has already proved deadly in Iraq and Syria, and Ankara must take the lead to neutralize this imminent threat on its borders.

Turkey is belatedly coming around to fighting ISIS because the U.S. is putting great pressure on Ankara. Yet the U.S. government cannot confront ISIS on its own. Therefore, Turkey should become more confrontational with ISIS not because Washington wants it – but because it’s in Ankara’s ultimate best interest. With comments like Erdogan’s equating ISIS with the PKK, it’s obvious that this message is still not being communicated to the average Turkish citizen very well.

The terrorists are now literally at Turkey’s southern gates. And one day, in the not too distant future, they will look north, to those rich, attractive cities in Anatolia, and begin sharpening their knives for the conquest. And the Turks will have no one to blame but themselves if they don’t act now.

 

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Topics: Turkey

soundoff (71 Responses)
  1. Zhang

    A lot of dirty Pakistanis with dirty curry BO have entered Turkey.
    They smell so bad.

    October 31, 2014 at 1:56 pm | Reply
  2. Allan Kinsman©

    I use to enjoy the exchange of ideas on this blog. Today however the serious problems of the world are reflected. Hate is expressed here and in the world through conflict of ideologies. So much concrete and not a substance which is used for construction of a positive. Yes indeed the problems of the world are enhanced by a well worn dogma of our human minds. I know I have spent a life time in the realization of it's depth and breath in myself. An exchange of a possible solution would be a welcomed revelation however not forthcoming here. I bid you farewell.

    October 31, 2014 at 2:24 pm | Reply
    • banasy©

      I'm sorry to see you go; I understand completely.

      October 31, 2014 at 3:04 pm | Reply
      • Zhang

        @banasy. I won't be sorry to see you go. Why don't you follow Allan's foot steps? In the long run we'll be glad you did, chump.

        October 31, 2014 at 11:41 pm |
      • banasy©

        Adam:
        No.

        November 1, 2014 at 1:57 pm |
    • Ferhat Balkan

      Allan, you had a unique way of looking at problems and your input was always appreciated. I hope you'll reconsider your decision and stay, but I can't blame you. You're absolutely right.

      October 31, 2014 at 5:36 pm | Reply
      • Zhang

        @Ferhat. Blah blah blah. You feel so bad move in with him.
        Then you can BOTH take a hike and stay at Twitter, you little chump!

        October 31, 2014 at 11:44 pm |
    • George patton

      I too am sorry to see you quit this website, Allan. These Tea Partying idiots who have nothing to say here need to be blocked from this web page once and for all.

      October 31, 2014 at 5:55 pm | Reply
      • Zhang

        Oh yea, blocked, Georgie? I agree on the condition that we start with you. Self-righteous chump.

        October 31, 2014 at 11:50 pm |
    • Allan Kinsman©

      Thank you Chrissy, George,Banasy, Ferhat for your comments. I have found an honest lively discussion often corrects, clarify's and improves one's point of view and although I rarely argue with a point I often later realize the error in my opinion. We are trying to find our way and as they say doubt is a far better friend than certainty. I appreciate the honest points of view here as I continue using a different vehicle to new summits of thought. Be well.

      October 31, 2014 at 8:50 pm | Reply
      • Joseph McCarthy

        Beautifully put, Allan. Thank you and you will be missed here.

        October 31, 2014 at 9:01 pm |
      • Zhang

        Hey Joseph? Take a long hike. Go down Mexico way. Don't come back.

        November 1, 2014 at 12:09 am |
    • Zhang

      @Allan. So long chump. Drop us a Christmas card from your perfect non-confrontational world would you?

      October 31, 2014 at 11:36 pm | Reply
      • Allan Kinsman©

        Well your welcome. Here is what is truly amusing, and my last comment, I really don't know and I only have a limited time here but your example of being confrontational is truly a joke on you. You see better than a thoughtful or intelligent comment you use false courage to express the opinion of a bully. It's always the same with people like you. For without any personal insight or even the step below cleaverness your loud voice stands for all people which bathe in dogma. Eventually lost in the muck of your anger and darkness you will awaken or be your own demise.

        November 1, 2014 at 1:44 am |
      • Joey Isotta-Fraschini ©

        @ Troll,
        Good job on @ Allan Kinsman©.
        Too obvious, but good.

        November 1, 2014 at 6:44 am |
      • Joey Isotta-Fraschini

        Well said, Allan. This Zhang must be a Chinese Tea Partier, judging by his hateful comments here. At least he's not making these ever boring childish posts here like so many others lately. I too will miss reading your posts, Good bye, Allan.

        November 1, 2014 at 9:20 am |
    • Joe Blow

      Feel free to play in traffic with all the free time you will have now not playing super expert on the Internet.

      November 1, 2014 at 3:22 pm | Reply
  3. George patton

    How on earth can ISIS threaten Turkey when it can't it's own in either Iraq or Syria? As usual, the right-wing media is trying to scare the general public into supporting our unscrupulous politicians in Washington, the right-wing thugs!!!

    October 31, 2014 at 4:31 pm | Reply
  4. Michael66

    Everyone is kicking their feet in the dirt playing around and letting ISIS grow and grow and one day these not-so great leaders will be saying "gee, we should have fought them when we had the chance" right before ISIS beheads them.

    Oddly, the leaders said they should have done something when ISIS was just a handful full of guys, and now as they are continuing to grow in wealth, weapons, and armies, everyone is playing stupid.

    The only ones actually making progress against ISIS is the Kurds, and Turkey needs to get off their butts and let all those in Turkey who wish to join up with the Kurds, do so and with the US doing airstrikes, ISIS could be forced back until they are completely boxed in.
    But no, everyone wants to play dumbshyts and pretend like a 300,000 guys(which is just a dent of the Kurd population who would fight along side their brothers but cant, because Turkey wont let them cross over) couldn't wipe out ISIS in a matter of days.

    I think the Kurds are well deserving of their own State and US should be doing everything possible to aide them.

    October 31, 2014 at 4:38 pm | Reply
    • George patton

      Thank you, Michael66. I agree as far as the Kurds are concerned. We need to change our policies regarding the Middle East.

      October 31, 2014 at 4:45 pm | Reply
      • Michael66

        The trouble is, the only thing The US cares about is the mighty control of oil and right now ISIS is selling it dirt cheap and I could be wrong, but its quite odd that our gas prices have dropped more in the last few weeks than it has in years, so it seems that even the US is getting their hands on the Oil bought with the destruction of human life.

        This is why even Turkey is lagging at doing anything, they are also buying up this black market oil.

        Disclaimer, I am just your average joe, but have been following almost every news story since the day ISIS took over their first city, and try to read all the viral topics about this and am concluding my own opinions.
        I am far from having any real knowledge of politics.

        But everything I believe has eventually come true and I think most of what is going on is obvious.
        US says it will take them years to train an army to fight ISIS.
        Bull, there is over a million boots ready and willing to fight ISIS but can not because no-one will let them.
        Us and Turkey seems to be giving just enough support to the Kurds in Kobane (spell check) just to make it look good.
        I believe that Turkey rather ISIS take over that border town, but if that happens, in the end, ISIS will begin to advance on Turkey once it has the man power and weapons to do so.

        I think USA will eventually slow done its aide to the Kurds to the point it falls completely due to lack of supplies.
        The Kurds can hold off ISIS forever, just as long as they have the man power and weapons.
        They have a huge upper hand on ISIS, and have positions that ISIS can not take.

        I hope I am wrong though and the US does step up its aid to the Kurds, they are allies and are the only ones who have their politics in order over there and deserve to be a state.

        October 31, 2014 at 5:00 pm |
  5. Ferhat Balkan

    It is clear to see that this article is aimed at pushing Turkey into a war and to force it into the quagmire that is Iraq and Syria. Fortunately, Turkey has thus far avoided the conflict and for many good reasons. The article argues that if Turkey doesn’t get involved now, she may face a greater threat from ISIS in the future… That may be true, however Turkey has a very powerful military and can very well protect itself from any outside threat. On top of that, Turkey has a full membership of NATO and as such, other NATO members have the obligation to protect Turkey in such an event. It would be suicidal for ISIS to even consider attacking Turkey any time soon. So the truth is that ISIS doesn’t pose an immediate threat to Turkey even though they’re close to the border.
    What is a more immediate threat to Turkey is the PKK. The PKK Marxist-Communist terror group has waged war against Turkey for some 30 years that has resulted in the deaths of ~40,000 people. In the year 2012 alone, the PKK has been responsible for over 200 terrorist attacks. Here’s an excerpt from the US Department Of State on terrorism during that year: “A wide range of violent extremist ideologies remained a threat: anarchists in Greece continued to launch low-level attacks against government offices, private businesses, and symbols of the state, and long-active radical ethno-nationalist groups like the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) in Turkey continued their campaigns of violence. Of these groups, the deadliest was the PKK. According to the NATO Centre of Excellence-Defence Against Terrorism in Ankara, there were 226 terrorist incidents reported through November.” (http://www.state.gov/j/ct/rls/crt/2012/209981.htm)
    Kobani is a ghost town with only PYD and PKK fighters there. Most civilians left and are safe inside Turkey. There are some 2 million refugees in Turkey (mostly Kurds). Turkey shelters them, feeds them and provides facilities better than any other country. This in itself takes a huge economic toll. Yet the West still wants Turkey to lead the charge in a war that could last for years. Reading this article, one can clearly see that the mess that was created by the 2003 invasion of Iraq (which Turkey abstained from getting involved in) is now somehow shifted to look like it is Turkey’s fault.
    So tell me, why should Turkey get involved? To help the PKK in Kobani? Furthermore, Assad killed more people than ISIS could ever hope for. Yet, somehow there’s no strategy to deal with Assad. In fact, there’s no concrete strategy whatsoever. So I ask again, why should Turkey risk its own soldier’s lives in a mess that has no end in sight? I’m sorry, but if the West wants Turkey’s troops on the ground, then the West has to be willing to do the same. Turkey can make her own decisions when it comes to who is a greater threat and what needs to be done.

    October 31, 2014 at 5:06 pm | Reply
    • Michael66

      ISIS is a terrorist group who mass murders anyone it wants to, including children, Turkey is violating NATO because they are allowing ISIS to travel freely in and out of their country and are aiding in the selling of the black market oil and are aiding ISIS with the sells of weapons.

      NATO has to aid the innocents and Turkey is actually aiding the terrorists and because everyone is getting cheap oil, they are turning their backs on what is actually going on and making excuses for Turkey.

      30 some countries agreed to assist in stopping ISIS, and it has been about a month now, and other than a free air strikes from a few random countries, nothing really massive has been done.

      About ISIS not being able to hurt Turkey, you are dead wrong.
      They work from the inside as well as the out.
      No one will attack them because they hide among the civilians and with that sort of strategy, they could make a huge mark on Turkey.
      Turkey is their allies though and some people are in denial of that one.

      October 31, 2014 at 5:20 pm | Reply
      • Ferhat Balkan

        Michael, I appreciate your views on this, but I can see that you're simply projecting the biased view that the media spreads about Turkey. I agree that ISIS is a terrorist group and perhaps ISIS is the worst one we've seen thus far... That does not change the facts that I outlined about the PKK in my previous comment. To Turkey, the PKK fighting ISIS is like 2 terror groups fighting each other...
        Now, to address your other accusations... Turkey's economy is largely driven by tourism. There are millions of tourists traveling to Turkey each year. Not a single person traveling to and from Turkey has a stamp on their forehead that says "ISIS". Turkey can't read the minds of every traveler that travels there. Furthermore, the "Black Market" that you talk about is illegal in Turkey. People will do illegal things even if the government outlaws them. Let me give you an example: The Mexican border is being used to smuggle drugs into the US. Does that mean that the US is allowing it? No. Same thing with Turkey. Those 30 countries that you mentioned do not host 2 million refugees like Turkey does, so expecting Turkey to do even more is hypocritical and unfair. How am I wrong that ISIS poses no threat to Turkey? Thus far they've not attacked Turkey. They even released Turkish hostages not that long ago. I'm sorry, but you don't make a convincing statement.

        October 31, 2014 at 5:56 pm |
      • Clay Phelps

        Thanks Ferhat for the counterpoint. Just goes to show that there can be more than one possible motivating factor.

        November 4, 2014 at 2:09 am |
  6. chri§§y

    @ Allan, there are a great many of us here who do appreciate reading your posts. They are very informative so yes i also, am sorry to hear you are leaving! I do understand though. Its rather frustrating trying to have an on topic discussion with the intrusion of the immature antics of "child trolls" repeated rants. May you have a blessed life, and we shall remember your insight on topics for years to come.

    October 31, 2014 at 5:12 pm | Reply
    • George patton

      I can't blame Allan, chrissy. In fact chrissy, I quit posting here because these "child trolls" spoiled these discussions here for the rest of us. CNN needs to screen these people and block their idiotic rants once and for all!!!

      October 31, 2014 at 5:49 pm | Reply
      • Joe Blow

        Uh Mr Patton aka: butt pirate

        Quit crying like a little school girl on the Internet. Perhaps if you stopped sitting down to pee you might not get so butt hurt by random people on the Internet not agreeing with your stupid perspective.

        November 1, 2014 at 3:21 pm |
  7. Michael66

    @Ferhat Balkan odd that you or someone stopped my ability to reply to your last post and ironically you said I am basing my opinion on a biased position from the media and you are doing the exact same thing.
    Everyone knows that ISIS controls the OIL reserves and refineries that they took control of, so how the hell can Turkey not know who they are buying the OIL off of?

    As for your Mexican Drug trafficking which makes it into the US, it is hidden and not freely let in.
    The Oil that makes its way into Turkey, is freely let in and not even hidden.
    Huge difference.

    October 31, 2014 at 6:20 pm | Reply
    • Ferhat Balkan

      Michael, there are CNN filters that prevent certain words from being posted (even non-offensive ones). That could explain why your comment didn't go through. It has happened to me plenty of times in the past.
      Actually, I'm bilingual. I read and follow news in English as well as that of Turkish. So I see the news from both sides. Of course, that doesn't make my views or statements any more correct, but it gives me a unique perspective to this situation.
      Sure, ISIS controls rich oil fields and sells them on the black market. Gas prices in places such as Turkey are $2.71/liter that's per LITER not gallon. If the price per barrel is let's say.. $200 and someone comes up to you and says.. Hey, I'll sell it to you for $125. Wouldn't you take the one for $125? Of course you would! Businesses don't care how that oil got there. They care about profit. The same thing would happen if the prices in the US were that high and someone across the border from Mexico was selling cheaper oil produced by the Cartel. This is how ISIS was able to make money from selling oil. Unfortunately, most media don't care to talk about the details of the 'how'. Instead, they prefer to play the blame game. Turkey has tried to crack down on such illegal activities, but at a border with the chaos of war looming on the other side, such things often go unnoticed or find loop holes. It is unfair to assume that Turkey is able to control everything that goes in and out from the border. Turkey has a 800km border with Syria alone. You should know that it is not easy to control everything that goes across it.

      October 31, 2014 at 6:44 pm | Reply
      • Michael66

        No, I am unable to reply to that post you made, because there is no reply option.
        It what is going on.
        Maybe a glitch?

        I am sorry but no-one could smuggle oil into the US.

        Turkey knows exactly who they are buying the Oil off of, simply because we all know who now controls the oil.
        There is no way around the obvious.
        Your position is philosophical rigor and not actually explaining how those who know who has the oil now are buying it without them knowing who is actually selling it.

        It would be like saying that someone on the street could get away with selling "Big Mac's" and the only Mcdonalds around was taken over by terrorists and them claiming "we thought the food came from Mcdonalds, not a terrorists group who took over the Mcdonalds"

        Again, ISIS has control of the Oil now, it is public knowledge that even I know, so to buy it, is to fund them, there is no "we didn't know who is selling it" that will wash.

        Might as well claim that the only painting of the Mona Lisa, if stolen, the one who buys it can claim he didn't know it was stolen.

        Again I will stress that I am the dumb one here and have no idea of what I am talking about.

        October 31, 2014 at 8:59 pm |
      • Michael66

        I am new here and some posts have the reply option and some do not, it doesn't seem to be a set pattern.
        Do you know why?

        October 31, 2014 at 9:06 pm |
      • Ferhat Balkan

        Michael, I'm afraid it's not that simple. When the price of oil is as high as that in Turkey, people find all sorts of creative ways to smuggle oil across the border. If you don't believe me, read this article from CBS: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/turkey-cracks-down-on-oil-smuggling-with-isis-in-mind/

        October 31, 2014 at 9:24 pm |
      • Ferhat Balkan

        To answer your second post, yes, that's by design. You can only post 2 replies, until the reply link is taken away. This is due to the indentation that happens every time a reply is entered. This is to prevent comments from creating too many indentations. What most commenters do is simply click on the available reply button (even if it's a reply to their own comment) and place a @ sign towards the commentator name that they're writing to. I'm not sure if that made any sense, but it seems to be the way things go around here. Also, welcome to the CNN blogs. I hope you stick around, even if we don't always agree🙂

        October 31, 2014 at 9:30 pm |
      • Michael66

        But your examples and link do not prove that they do not know who they are funding when buying the oil and it is an intellectually dishonest attempt to dumb down who they know the oil is coming from.
        Which is the whole argument that I made.
        Turkey knows who has control and nothing makes the methods of smuggling less obvious to where it is coming from.

        As you can tell by now, I look at the bigger picture and not the arguments.
        ISIS has control of the oil and they know damn well where it's coming from simply because ISIS controls the oil now.

        Those being caught as for show unless Turkey is that stupid to not know that the Oil coming across the borders are coming from oil controlled by ISIS.

        Where exactly else can this oil come from considering ISIS controls it now?
        Heading to bed and this is a learning experience for me, so please do not take me wrong and I am here to learn and give my opinion as well.

        Turkey seems to be taking a huge blind eye to this.
        "Isis takes over the oil, huge amounts begin pouring in at a cheaper cost"
        "nothing to see here folks"

        Again, thanks for the respectable discussion.
        And I am sorry if I come off disrespectful as I mean no harm and am just blunt and simple minded.

        BB tomorrow.

        October 31, 2014 at 9:55 pm |
      • Michael66

        But I realize that Turkey can not stop the flow of oil, because they need it to supply their normal life.

        I read the article and see where you are coming from.
        Hope to engage you more later on, refreshing to not be treated like dirt for a change on news articles.

        BBL laker.

        October 31, 2014 at 9:58 pm |
  8. chri§§y

    Also @ Ferhat, some of us posting replies do not have the option of a reply button at all. Im assuming that to be because of the mobile device we are using. For instance i have an older model cell phone...which when i update i still prefer this model because im quite used to it, so i just order a replacement which is identical to the one i currently have. But on the positive side, i can read all posts, not just the last page as is typical on the newer models.

    October 31, 2014 at 9:41 pm | Reply
    • Ferhat Balkan

      Indeed chri§§y, I noticed things look quite different on a mobile device like a phone or a tablet. I tend to use a PC, so things look and behave quite differently than on a phone. For instance, when I use my Android phone, I notice there are icons to each name. On the other hand, when I use the PC, I don't see those icons.

      October 31, 2014 at 9:48 pm | Reply
  9. chri§§y

    And @ Michael 66 i am relatively certain that no one here thinks you are dumb. In fact i think they would think you are anything but!😉

    October 31, 2014 at 9:50 pm | Reply
    • Michael66

      Thanks, just to leave with comedy, solve this one and I will open up who I am completely with this one.
      If you can salve this, you win the blonde lotto, a million dollars, a dollar a year for a million years😛
      [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVQz3c9ppbM&w=640&h=390]

      Yes ai am simple minded and enjoy to make people smile for a change.

      October 31, 2014 at 10:02 pm | Reply
  10. chri§§y

    Lol @ Ferhat, so ive been told. And maybe i will one day i will upgrade to a newer version phone. Ya know once you reach a certain age you become a creature of habbit.

    October 31, 2014 at 9:56 pm | Reply
    • Zhang

      Chrissy. You're just a creature. Period.
      Chump!

      October 31, 2014 at 11:58 pm | Reply
  11. chri§§y

    Lol @ Michael 66 the "blonde lotto eh" lololol. And its nice reading your posts. In fact a vast improvement over the rude, crude and socially unacceptable ones from the resident troll. Dont you agree @ Ferhat?

    October 31, 2014 at 10:20 pm | Reply
    • Ferhat Balkan

      Yes indeed. Just like every circus has a clown, it would seem every blog/forum has a troll... Michael may be misguided, but he clearly displays civility. I don't mind debating with opposite views. That is after all what these blogs and forums are for. We don't always have to meet eye to eye to have mutual respect for each other. @Michael: I would caution you to not mind the troll that goes around name calling people. He/She sometimes steals names (including my own) to spread bad language around the forum and confuse people. If you see that behavior, just ignore it.

      October 31, 2014 at 10:35 pm | Reply
      • Michael66

        I don't believe I am misguided, that would imply someone is leading me astray, and as I said, I follow almost all news discussions on ISIS related material, read a huge amount of the posts and gain my own perspective on what I see going on.
        I don't believe that "opposing views" actually means that someone is right and someone is wrong.

        When it comes to things of this nature, "politics" I think that none of us actually have it all the way correct.
        Question...
        Do you think the US's huge drop in gas prices have anything to do with the fact ISIS controls much oil and is selling it dirt cheap?
        I do.
        Gas has not dropped this low in years and all the sudden its being sold dirt cheap on the black market and gas in the uS has dropped to an all time low.
        Coincidence?

        October 31, 2014 at 10:55 pm |
      • Ferhat Balkan

        The media can sometimes lead people astray. Such as misleading people about Islam etc. As for dropping gas prices, I think it has more to do with greater production of oil at home and a slowing down of the global economy. I believe Fareed covered some of it on one of his previous articles. Found it here: http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2014/10/22/a-power-shift-in-global-oil-dynamics/

        Also, I don't want to sound like a advertising agent for Fareed, but if you need to read more of his articles, you can find them here: http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/
        Feel free to drop in comments on any of the articles🙂

        October 31, 2014 at 11:39 pm |
      • Michael66

        Yah that is Max, just have no clue how wordpress even works, I made this account a while back and never even used it and had the password saved on roboform, which I used to log in to post here.
        Obviously I screwed up because that YT video I linked goes directly to my YT account which links both my FB and my website, which anyone can figure out my real name from there.

        Somehow, someone got my personal info and filed taxes in my name last year and I just became aware of this 3 days ago.
        I have not worked in years, so no clue how someone managed to file taxes and get a refund in my name.

        I have no idea what I want to do anymore.
        I do know that not a soul can actually find my real address on line as even my godaddy domains have an old address on it.
        Being disabled and trying to make money online with google ads and a website/YT channel is scary business.

        October 31, 2014 at 11:57 pm |
    • Michael66

      Thanks again, tried to lay down, couldnt sleep, glad to have added something decent to the convo

      October 31, 2014 at 10:45 pm | Reply
    • Michael66

      I was wondering if you or @Ferhat Balkan could assist me in wordpress.
      Can people find all my posts on various blogs the use wordpress log in by clicking my profile just from this very post?

      Last thing I need is people being able to hunt me down from my discussions related to wordpress and beheading me.

      October 31, 2014 at 11:14 pm | Reply
      • Ferhat Balkan

        No worries. All I see in your Word Press profile is a picture of your cat? If you feel uncomfortable with the idea of sharing your blog on here, you could always change the email address that you use to leave a message here. Basically, any email that you don't have linked to a blog site would do. That will get rid of the link to your blog connected to your name.

        October 31, 2014 at 11:29 pm |
      • banasy©

        @Michael:
        You do not need to sign in to WP to post on GPS.
        This should give you a hint as to how our prolific troll operates.

        November 1, 2014 at 2:06 pm |
      • Michael66

        @banasy© I might just leave it this way and actually create a blog, as for trolls, I find them quite comical.
        They are like the blob, the more you feed them the bigger they get, if you do not feed them, they die,.

        November 1, 2014 at 2:38 pm |
      • banasy©

        Michael, I wish you luck.

        November 1, 2014 at 7:15 pm |
      • Michael66

        @banasy© thanks

        November 1, 2014 at 8:44 pm |
  12. Michael66

    test

    October 31, 2014 at 10:44 pm | Reply
  13. Zhang

    Test

    October 31, 2014 at 11:59 pm | Reply
  14. Zhang

    @Michael. I am using word press.
    Now I am shooting you the finger.
    Do you see it???

    __^___

    November 1, 2014 at 12:02 am | Reply
    • Michael66

      I assume you are one of the trolls who post on here?
      Good for you, your parents must be proud of your ability to make a jerk of yourself online.

      November 1, 2014 at 12:08 am | Reply
      • Zhang

        You're a bigger troll than I could ever be. You are not "new" here. You left big footprints on your writing style. You changed your personality, but I have an idea of who you are.
        Mr Michael66. Lol
        See you around, chump.

        November 1, 2014 at 12:17 am |
  15. Zhang

    Any questions?
    Good!

    November 1, 2014 at 12:06 am | Reply
    • Michael66

      Lmao, so who am I am?
      I am actually impressed that my engagement here has you concerned to who you think i might be.
      Obviously, you might think I am someone that you seem to hate (hence the middle finger) which I thought you were just some trolling kid.

      You can trust that I have better things to do than to troll total strangers online.
      But yah, if you are so paranoid that you think I am someone else, then you have have that right to I assume.
      They must have really upset you, ehhh?

      November 1, 2014 at 12:29 am | Reply
  16. Tamer Aydogdu

    Turkey does not have a presidential system and neither does the president have a party. Endogan resigned from his party to become the president. He is the head of state and not the head of government. He may be still influential but he is not running the show any more.

    November 1, 2014 at 10:43 am | Reply
  17. Allan Kinsman©

    Testing
    Testing

    November 1, 2014 at 2:52 pm | Reply
    • Allan Kinsman©

      I suppose a problem with the internet is you never know who is who and further comments from me will be from someone else. As in above. I didn't say I wouldn't read this blog.

      November 1, 2014 at 3:22 pm | Reply
  18. gerceklerikesfet

    Turkey is not doing enough against ISIS ? Turkish government, president all say the same thing.
    There MUST be a strategy, a whole roadmap on fight against ISIS. ISIS is the results of civil war (plus other things) in Syria and situation in Iraq. Fighting against ISIS on the ground but not having any action to stabilize the Syria and Iraq would mean fighting against this terrorist organization for decades to come.
    US and other coalition forces should also be able to listen to Turkey with the knowledge and experience in this region. Turkey had been warning western allies that if situation in Syria not getting better would lead such terrorist organizations. No action was taken against Syrian regime and this led to rise of ISIS. Now, Turkey basically says, let's fight against ISIS but let's remove the cause, the Syrian civil war.

    November 2, 2014 at 1:49 am | Reply
  19. j. von hettlingen

    Erdogan ought to think carefully the consequences of alienating the Kurds. If he likens PKK to ISIS and prefers to see ISIS destroy the Kurds in Kobane, Turkey would for ever be in turmoil, because the Kurds wouldn't forgive Ankara and make life difficult for Turkey in the coming years and decades.

    November 4, 2014 at 11:02 am | Reply
  20. bohoclub

    Reblogged this on Adventures with Anashe!.

    November 21, 2014 at 2:02 pm | Reply

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