November 1st, 2014
12:01 AM ET

Bourdain: Iran different from what I could have imagined

Fareed speaks with author and chef Anthony Bourdain about his visit to Iran. Watch the full interview on GPS this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN, or watch Bourdain in Iran on Parts Unknown at 9 p.m. ET.

So you did the thing most American negotiators haven't yet done, which is actually go to Iran.

Yes, and an incredible experience. What we saw inside Iran was extraordinary, heartbreaking, confusing, inspiring and very, very different than the Iran I expected from looking at it from afar, from a geopolitical sense or what we read on the news – what we know from that long and very contentious relationship we've had as nations.

What do you think was the most surprising thing to you?

To walk down the street as an American and have total strangers constantly saying, where are you from? America, have you tried our food? Thank you for coming. Just outgoing, friendly, welcoming to strangers, to a degree that we really experience very, very few places – and I'm talking Western Europe and allied nations.

We'd been told to expect that. But you get thrown by it when you face it everywhere. Our producer – it was his birthday and we all went out with our local crew to a very crowded restaurant. Traditional Persian music and Iranian families eating. And someone found out that my producer, it was his birthday. The entire restaurant sang "Happy Birthday" to him and presented him with a cake. It was a very different Iran than I had been led to expect or could have imagined.

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Topics: GPS Show • Iran
October 31st, 2014
03:01 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Debating extremism in Islam, whether to fight ISIS, and Bourdain on Iran

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: First, Fareed offers his take on political developments in Tunisia and Egypt, and explains what they say about the prospects for democracy in the Arab world.

“Tunisia's relative success is in marked contrast to the abysmal failure of Egypt, the Arab world’s largest and once most influential country,” Fareed says. “As in Tunisia, Egyptians also overthrew a dictator three years ago. But after Egypt's brief experiment with democracy, in which the Muslim Brotherhood was elected and then abused its authority, today the country is ruled by a repressive dictatorship.”

Then, Fareed’s first guest says that over 300 million Muslims are either jihadists or want to foist Islam on the world. Really? Sam Harris's recent appearance on Bill Maher's show sparked a big debate on the issue. Fareed sits down with Harris to discuss his take.

Also, should America and the West be involved in the fight against ISIS, or is it a local sectarian conflict, best left alone by the world? Fareed hosts a great debate.

Finally, writer and chef Anthony Bourdain discusses his trip to Iran – the food, the people and the culture behind politics in the Islamic Republic.

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Topics: GPS Show
October 29th, 2014
05:59 PM ET

What the marshmallow test says about self-control

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fifty years ago, a groundbreaking psychological experiment was conducted on preschoolers. It went something like this: The youngsters were put in a room where a marshmallow sat on a tray. They were told they could eat that one marshmallow immediately, or if they waited they would get a bigger reward: two marshmallows. So what did the kids do? What would you do? And what does the ability to wait mean for future success?

A lot, apparently. Fareed speaks with Walter Mischel, who was the brains behind this marshmallow experiment and has a new book out called The Marshmallow Test.

Watch the video for the full interview.

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Topics: GPS Show
October 25th, 2014
04:25 PM ET

The man behind the marshmallow test

Fifty years ago, a groundbreaking psychological experiment on self-control was conducted on preschoolers – involving marshmallows. Fareed speaks with Walter Mischel, the man behind the experiment. Watch the full interview this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

So you tracked these children down 50 years later, and what did you find?

Mischel: Oh, we found a great deal. We found to our surprise when they were about 13, 14, 15 years old, that the ones who had waited longer on the marshmallow test were doing better in school, were doing better socially and were doing better on SAT scores by quite a bit. And we became very interested in why are they – we seeing these differences? What's that really all about? And we began to pursue them, really, over the years, and approximately every 10 or 12 years, did a follow-up.

Now, when you kept tracking them, did that – this difference you saw – 10 years later, the kids who managed to have delayed gratification were doing better. Was it true 20 years later? Was it true 30 years later? Was it true 40 years later?

Mischel: What happens is that the ones who remain consistently high in self-control over the years, as opposed to the ones who remain consistently low in self-control over the years form two quite different life trajectories that are distinctly different.

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Topics: GPS Show
October 25th, 2014
03:41 PM ET

Has Obama presidency met expectations?

Fareed speaks with CNN Chief Political Analyst Gloria Borger and author and historian Sean Wilentz about President Barack Obama's presidency. Watch the full panel discussion this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

Paul Krugman gave this rousing defense of Obama...If you look at domestic policy, most consequential president since Lyndon Johnson. Do you agree with the basic outline?

Wilentz: I think Paul is basically right. But Paul and I have been on the same page from the beginning – skeptical at first, much more respectful now of what the president has managed to achieve. I mean, it's not spectacular, but a lot of people had very, very high expectations, shall we say?

It's hard to be disillusioned...

Borger: Including Obama.

Wilentz: Well, indeed. But it's hard to be disillusioned if you weren't “illusioned” to begin with. And judged on a more rational scale, I think the president’s done a good job.

Borger: Yes, I think the problem here for the American people, and I don't know how this plays out in history, is that when you look at President Obama, you look at the numbers we're looking at now, it's a question of leadership. It's a question of whether he has communicated well to the American public about his successes, which you could argue, in the future, health care reform will be judged as a success. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Politics
October 24th, 2014
07:22 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Analysis of the Canada shooting, how Obama's presidency will be remembered, and the marshmallow test

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: The show opens with a special live segment to discuss the shooting that took place this week in Ottawa. What do we know about the attack? How serious is the threat of lone extremists? And how should Canada and others respond? Fareed offers his take before holding a panel discussion.

Next, President Barack Obama has come in for criticism for his administration’s handling of the economy, Ebola and national security. But how deserving is he of such criticism? And how will his administration be remembered? Fareed convenes a panel including Walter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute and the author of The Innovators: How A Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, CNN Chief Political Analyst Gloria Borger, Sean Wilentz, who has written about presidents from Jefferson to Lincoln to Reagan, and Amity Shlaes, a historian and writer with four New York Times best-sellers.

Also, 50 years ago, a groundbreaking psychological experiment was conducted on preschoolers – involving marshmallows. What did the children do? What would you do? Walter Mischel, the man behind the experiment, explains what it says about self-control.

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Topics: GPS Show
October 21st, 2014
04:39 PM ET

How big a threat does ISIS pose?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Admiral James Stavridis, former supreme allied commander at NATO and author of The Accidental Admiral, and Daniel Benjamin, a former coordinator for counterterrorism at the State Department and now director of The Dickey Center for International Understanding, about the threat posed by ISIS. Watch the video for the full interview.

Jim, it does feel like they've got their hands full, ISIS that is, between Iraq and Syria and all the forces that are battling them.

Stavridis: I think that this is a kind of a short-term/long-term set of constraints for us.

In the short-term, I completely agree, they've got their hands full. They've got Peshmerga coming from the north, they've got Iraqi security from the south, they've got bombing in the west. They're very busy. They're going to be in the middle of a three-front war very soon.

Long-term, there's not only, as Dan mentioned, I think ultimately the threat to the homeland – they have said they intend to fly the black flag of ISIS over the White House, I don't know how more direct they can be. But it is long-term. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show
October 20th, 2014
05:59 PM ET

Expert: Some good news on Ebola fight

Fareed speaks with Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who co-discovered the Ebola virus.

You worry about the fact that this could spread in the very large, very congested cities in Africa, for example, in Nigeria. And at that point, this could really spread like lightning.

Well, first of all, the three countries that are affected are being totally destabilized, not only in terms of people who are killed by Ebola, their families, the orphans that now are coming up because the parents die, but the economy has come to a standstill. People are massively dying from other diseases that are normally treatable, like malaria, or women die while giving birth because hospitals are abandoned or are full with Ebola patients.

So that’s a very, very destabilizing factor. And that's going to go in its impact beyond Ebola.

Now the big question will be, will this spread to surrounding countries? The good news is that both Nigeria and Senegal have been able to contain a number important cases. In Senegal, there wasn’t even any secondary case. In Nigeria, there were a number of people who were infected and died, but it has not given rise to an outbreak in Lagos, after all, a city of more than 20 million people, or in Port Harcourt. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Health
October 20th, 2014
10:36 AM ET

Revisiting my 'Roots'

Watch 'Roots', a CNN special, this Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

For the past couple of months, CNN correspondents and anchors, including me, have been doing deep reporting on a topic that's rather foreign to most of us. That topic is ourselves, our family histories, where we came from. In short, our roots. It was something that didn't come naturally to me at all, but in the end it was fascinating.

You know, I'm curious about the world and about how it works and about what's going on politically and economically and technologically around the world. I'm not that curious about where I specifically come from. I'm just one guy among the billions of people on earth, and I have never until this project, never, ever looked into it in any way one way or the other. I came to America and I naturalized and now I'm an Indian-American.

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Topics: GPS Show
October 18th, 2014
02:32 PM ET

Analyst: There’s been a lot of hyperventilation about the ISIS threat to U.S.

Fareed speaks with Admiral James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, the former supreme allied commander of NATO, and author of The Accidental Admiral, and Daniel Benjamin, a former coordinator for counterterrorism at the State Department, about the threat posed by ISIS. Watch the full interview Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

Daniel Benjamin, you’ve written that you believe that the ISIS threat to the United States, and I think to the West, is being exaggerated. Why don't you explain?

Benjamin: Correct, Fareed. I think that there’s been a lot of hyperventilation about the threat. I think over the long-term, the safe havens that have been established in Iraq and in Syria do pose a significant challenge for the United States. But right now, this conflict is primarily about Sunni versus Shia. This is an insurgent force. It is not a terrorist force, first and foremost, although they use terrorist tactics locally against their enemies.

The U.S. authorities, whether from the National Counterterrorism Center or from the Department of Homeland Security or from the FBI, have said that they don't know of any plotting against the United States at home and, in fact, there's been very little reporting on any desire to carry out attacks outside of the area.

And let's remember, this is a group that has no carried out a terrorist attack outside of its immediate neighborhood, ever. And that's a major fact. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show
October 18th, 2014
01:18 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Is ISIS threat exaggerated? And why are the markets rattled?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: Fareed speaks with Admiral James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, the former supreme allied commander of NATO, and author of The Accidental Admiral, and Daniel Benjamin, a former coordinator for counterterrorism at the State Department, about the threat posed by ISIS.

Next, Fareed speaks with Peter Piot, who co-discovered Ebola, about why this outbreak is so serious, and how the world should respond.

Later, what has gotten stock markets and economists worried recently? The head of the IMF says the world economy is not in a new normal, but a new mediocre. What is happening? Fareed speaks with Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator at The Financial Times and the author of The Shift and the Shocks: What We've Learned and Still Have to Learn from the Financial Crisis, and Rana Foroohar, Time’s assistant managing editor.

“The European situation looks very bad,” Wolf says. “There's obviously a lot of bad geopolitical news. And there's also, I think, a lot of uncertainty.”

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Topics: GPS Show
October 17th, 2014
04:52 PM ET

Will airstrikes be enough against ISIS?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Francis Fukuyama, the American Enterprise Institute’s Danielle Pletka, Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose, and Walter Russell Mead, a professor of international affairs at Bard College, about the Obama administration's strategy for countering ISIS, and whether air power will be enough.

Watch the video for the full panel discussion.

 

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Topics: GPS Show • ISIS
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