September 23rd, 2014
01:13 AM ET

Bill Clinton: Two books you should read

Fareed asks former U.S. President Bill Clinton for his 'Book of the Week.'

Mr. President, we usually have an end segment where I recommend a book of the week. We are blowing it out all for you, so I'm giving you the last word, which is what book would you recommend? You're a voracious reader. If you were to tell our readers, what should they read?

If you'll give me two.

Sure.

First, I'd like readers to read Abundance, the Peter Diamandis book with his coauthor, because if they did that, they would see that while the headlines are really bad in the world today, the trend lines are pretty good. Extreme poverty is down. The health care is improving dramatically around the world. There are developments now which make me believe we might be able to do what we did in the 1990s, which is to use technological developments to create more jobs than we lose. For the last few months, for the first time in literally more than a decade, 40 percent of the new jobs have been in higher wage categories. I think people should read this and get some good ideas. The other book is The Social Conquest of Earth by E.O. Wilson. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show
September 20th, 2014
07:28 PM ET

Modi: Today's era once again belongs to Asia

Fareed speaks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi about comparisons between India and China. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

After your election people have begun asking again a question that has been asked many times for the last two decades, which is, will India be the next China? Will India be able to grow at 8 to 9 percent a year consistently, and transform itself and thus transform the world?

See, India doesn’t need to become anything else. India must become only India. This is a country that once upon a time was called the golden bird. We’ve fallen from where we were before. But now we have the chance to rise again. If you see the details of the last five or ten centuries, you will see that India and China have grown at similar paces. Their contributions to global GDP have risen in parallel, and fallen in parallel. Today's era once again belongs to Asia. India and China are both growing rapidly, together.

But people would still I think wonder can India achieve the kind of 8 and 9 percent growth rates that China has done consistently for 30 years, and India has only done for a short period.

It’s my absolute belief that Indians have unlimited talent. I have no doubt about our capabilities. I have a lot of faith in the entrepreneurial nature of our 1.25 billion people. There is a lot of capability. And I have a clear road map to channel it.

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Topics: China • GPS Show • India
September 20th, 2014
01:20 PM ET

Clinton: 3 lessons of the Ebola crisis

Fareed speaks with former U.S. President Bill Clinton about the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

You’ve worked a lot on issues like disease prevention. What lesson do you think we should draw from this outbreak of Ebola and the speed and kind of pace with which it’s spread?  When you look at it, can you tell us about maybe the potential for pandemics or anything?

Well, first, like anybody else who's involved, we have a big presence in Liberia and three of our people, our top people, have stayed in Liberia to help organize the response. So we've all got to figure out, you know, how to coordinate it better. We're going to have a special session on it at CGI (Clinton Global Initiative).

But the lesson we should draw, the lessons are twofold. One is we have to do a much better job in building the health care infrastructure in these countries. We have to increase their capacity, including the capacity to have community health workers go out in these villages and have credibility with people. You know, this tragic story of the health workers being killed in Guinea, it's just terrible.  But if we have more capacity, we can deal with it quicker. So that’s the first thing.

The second thing is we're going to have to get quicker and nimbler at developing biomedical responses, you know, the vaccines or whatever, or cures.

And the third thing is the wealthy countries have got to reexamine how we fund the World Health Organization, because I think they do a marvelous job. But increasingly, as development ministries get more expertise in given areas, they want to fund specific projects in specific countries. And it's clear that the World Health Organization needs a pot of money that can be mobilized in a hurry for emergencies while we wait for the inevitable time delay when America and the U.K. and France and Scandinavia, we all kick in money.

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Topics: GPS Show • Health
September 20th, 2014
03:31 AM ET

Clinton: Turnout key to Democrats holding Senate

Fareed speaks with former U.S. President Bill Clinton about the Democratic Party’s prospects in this year’s midterm elections. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

I've got to ask you about some politics. Are the Democrats going to hold the Senate?

I think so, but it's going to be close. And it depends, frankly, on whether we can continue to match the money provided by all these outside groups. I think the Koch brothers are going to spend about $300 million in the last couple of months. And it depends on who turns out.  We have got somehow, sooner or later, to convince the people that to vote in presidential elections for our side they have to vote in the Congressional elections. And if they don't, they can't complain when they lose governorships, state legislators and members of Congress and the senators who happen to be up in that year.

We've got a lot more senators up this year than the Republicans do. And we have them up in states that President Obama did not carry in 2012. But they're running great campaigns and we seem to be doing reasonably well.  But if you look at all these polls, which are all over the place…that is the real question in polling today, is the sample you pick based on who you think will vote. And the answer to that is, no one knows. So if we can get our turnout up, we'll be fine and they'll hold the Senate.

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Topics: GPS Show
September 20th, 2014
03:23 AM ET

Clinton on the ISIS threat

Fareed speaks with former U.S. President Bill Clinton about how to respond to the threat posed by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

So I've got to ask you about ISIS. I saw you on "The Daily Show" say that you thought we had to respond to these brutal executions of Americans. But I want to press you. Isn't that what ISIS wants? Wasn’t the purpose of the executions to bait us?

No, but there's a difference in, for example, using targeted drones and airstrikes as we did against al Qaeda effectively for years to try to take down their leadership and infrastructure and let them know they can't just decapitate people for the cheap thrill of the global media response. And horrifying people and get away with it and getting bogged down in the kind of war they would like us to get bogged down in – that would cost us a lot of lives and a lot of treasure and inevitably lead to greater civilian casualties. That’s why I think the president's strategy has a chance of succeeding, because the Iraqi government is now more inclusive than it has been since the fall of Saddam Hussein. And that seems to be awakening, if you will, the willingness of the Sunni tribal leaders to participate in fighting.

We know the Kurds and the Peshmerga are willing to fight. If we can help them and support them, I think the larger fight against ISIS can continue as it should – as a local struggle for the freedom and liberty of the people. ​

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Topics: GPS Show
September 19th, 2014
12:36 AM ET

Modi: Extremists 'a crisis against humanity'

Fareed speaks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi about al Qaeda’s plan to launch a new branch on the Indian subcontinent. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

Ayman al-Zawahiri the head of al Qaeda has issued a video and an appeal trying to create an al Qaeda in India. In South Asia, he says, but the message was really directed towards India. And he says he wants to free Muslims from the oppression they face in Gujarat, in Kashmir. Do you think, do you worry that something like this could succeed?

My understanding is that they are doing injustice towards the Muslims of our country. If anyone thinks Indian Muslims will dance to their tune, they are delusional. Indian Muslims will live for India. They will die for India. They will not want anything bad for India.

Why do you think it is that there is this remarkable phenomenon that you have a 170 million Muslims, and there seem to be almost no or very few members of Al-Qaeda, even though al Qaeda is in Afghanistan, and of course the many in Pakistan. What is it that has made this community not as susceptible?

Firstly, I’m not the authority for doing a psychological and religious analysis on this…But the question is whether or not humanity should be defended in the world? Whether or not believers in humanity should unite? This is a crisis against humanity, not a crisis against one country or one race. So we have to frame this as a fight between humanity and inhumanity. Nothing else.

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Topics: GPS Show • India
September 19th, 2014
12:14 AM ET

Modi on the Indo-U.S. relationship

Fareed speaks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi about U.S. ties with India. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

There are many people in the United States, and some in India, who wish that the United States and India were much closer allies – the world’s oldest democracy, the world’s biggest democracy. But somehow that has never happened, and there have always been these frictions and difficulties. Do you think it’s possible for the United States and India to develop a genuinely strategic alliance?

I have a one word answer: Yes. And with great confidence I say yes. Let me explain. There are many similarities between India and America. If you look at the last few centuries, two things come to light. America has absorbed people from around the world…and there is an Indian in every part of the world. This characterizes both the societies. Indians and Americans have coexistence in their natural temperament.

Now, yes, for sure, there have been ups and downs in our relationship in the last century. But from the end of the 20th century to the first decade of the 21st century, there has been a big change. Our ties have deepened. India and the United States of America are bound together, by history and by culture. These ties will deepen further.

So far in your contacts with the Obama administration – you have had several cabinet ministers come here – do you feel that there is a genuine desire from Washington to try to upgrade the relationship with India substantially?

Relations between India and America should not be seen within the limits of just Delhi and Washington. It’s a much larger sphere. The good thing is that the mood of both Delhi and Washington is in harmony with this understanding. Both sides have played a role in this.

 

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Topics: GPS Show • India
September 17th, 2014
12:15 PM ET

Uber's mission? 'Transportation as reliable as running water'

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Travis Kalanick – You may not know his name, but you probably are well aware of the company he founded and runs, Uber. The company is a tech darling with an astounding valuation of $18 billion. That company has changed the way people get around cities from Raleigh-Durham to Rio to Riyadh, from Stockholm to Sydney to Seoul.

In all, Uber is in 200 cities in 45 countries on six continents and counting. But not everybody loves Uber or the disruption in the transportation market. Germany, for one, just banned Uber from operating anywhere on its soil. Fareed sat down in Uber's "war room" at its San Francisco headquarters.

Watch the video for Kalanick's explanation of what Uber is trying to achieve.

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Topics: GPS Show • Technology
September 16th, 2014
07:04 PM ET

Assessing America's alternative energy future

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

The crisis in Iraq and Syria, fueled by oil. The crisis in Ukraine, greatly complicated by natural gas. So what if we lived in a world that was powered by something other than these hydrocarbons we are so dependent on. That's a world that Vinod Khosla is betting on, quite literally. Khosla was the founding CEO of Sun Microsystems. He now runs his own firm, Khosla Ventures, and is the 352nd richest person in America, according to Forbes. In recent years, most of his energy has gone into finding promising alternate energy technologies, and investing in them.

Watch the video for the interview for his take on the future of alternative energy.

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Topics: Energy • GPS Show
September 14th, 2014
01:08 AM ET

Kissinger on the evolving global order

Fareed speaks with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger about the current global order and the concept of American exceptionalism. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

In reading your book, what is striking is you describe a world order, really the Westphalian world order, created after the religious wars in Europe that was conceived of and articulated and implemented by the West using Western values. And you point out that there is no such agreement now. The Chinese have their own conception of world order. The Islamic world has its own conception of the world order. Even the Indians have a very different conception.

So I read that part and I thought, my God, it’s going to be impossible to imagine any conceivable global world order, no matter how smart and engaged the U.S. president is or this is a structural shift that's taken place that is overwhelming.

No, it will be very difficult, but it has to begin by understanding what the differences are. And therefore, in stating one's objectives, one has a dual task and it's somewhat contradictory.

One has to be motivated by the values of our own society. And they are very inseparable from exceptionalism. But one has to understand that these are not self-evident somewhere else. And one has, therefore, to fit specific policies into a framework. That's very difficult. It's never… FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show
September 13th, 2014
06:33 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Fareed's take on ISIS, Kissinger on Ukraine, and the CEO of Uber

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: First, Fareed gives his take on President Obama’s speech on how to respond to the threat posed by ISIS – and looks at what the United States should and shouldn’t do.

Then, Fareed speaks with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger about the recent developments in Ukraine, how the U.S. should tackle ISIS, and what he thinks about Barack Obama and his administration’s foreign policy.

“I thought we withdrew too rapidly from the Iraq, not just militarily, but also with a political presence. And I have concerns about what will happen in Afghanistan unless we create an international framework for it,” Kissinger says. “But we should try to come up with non-partisan solutions in what is going to be an extremely difficult period.”

Later, Fareed speaks with former Jordanian Foreign Minister Marwan Muasher about President Obama’s ISIS strategy, and what role other countries in the Middle East might be willing to play.

Also on the show, Fareed speaks with Travis Kalanick, founder and CEO of Uber.

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Topics: GPS Show
September 10th, 2014
11:12 AM ET

Why sugar is worse than fat

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta about recent research on the risks of high sugar consumption. Watch the video for the full interview.

For 20 years, people have been assuming that fat was the enemy because it produced cholesterol, which was blocking arteries. That's not quite right.

I could talk about this all day long, because I think it highlights some very important things in terms of how we sometimes misinterpret science, or at least exaggerate it.

It was in the late '70s – in fact, there was a Senate commission, Senator McGovern, who actually looked at this issue and found that people who had very high levels of cholesterol tended to die early of heart disease. And there was also other studies that showed if you ate a diet high in fat, it raised your cholesterol. But those were two different studies. And they got really, really linked, not only by the Senate, but also in the scientific community and then by everybody else.

And what happened over the last 30 years, it got codified. It became the way that we eat low fat in this country. And nothing changed. In fact, things got worse. Cardiovascular disease remains the biggest killer of men and women. Diabetes rates are higher than ever before. Childhood obesity. So it didn't work. And I think that's what sort of prompted all this analysis. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Health
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