July 14th, 2014
02:43 PM ET

Is Russia's Crimea move akin to annexation of Kuwait?

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with former Swedish Prime Minster Carl Bildt, now the country’s foreign minister, about the recent tensions between Europe and Russia over Ukraine.

You gave a very tough speech at the Atlantic Council in which you said that Russia's annexation of Crimea has only one parallel in modern history, in the last 30, 40 years, and that was Iraq – Saddam Hussein's annexation of Kuwait. That was, of course, met with a massive international coalition that repulsed that intervention. What is one to conclude from the fact that there’s no such forceful counter-measure in this case?

Well, I mean in the case of Saddam Hussein in Kuwait, of course, there was a resolution by the U.N. Security Council. Now, Russia is a member of the Security Council, so that's never going to happen. I mean they're going to block everything that is related to this.

But I think it’s important that we are extremely firm on how grave the violation of international law is that Russia has undertaken in the case of Crimea, and that we make very clear to Russia that the invasion, the occupation and the annexation of Crimea will have consequences. We will never accept it. And it will be a burden on our bilateral relationship for as long as it lasts.

We’re not going to undo the occupation immediately, but we must be very clear that it isn’t acceptable – it wasn’t acceptable in the Kuwait case, it's not acceptable in the Crimea case. It is not acceptable in any future other cases, either.

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Topics: GPS Show • Russia • Ukraine
July 12th, 2014
11:36 PM ET

Where America Works: How Denver is tackling the student debt problem

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

When it comes to student debt in the United States, the numbers are truly staggering – in 2012, 71 percent of new bachelor’s degree graduates had debt, averaging over $29,000. Over the last ten years, student debt has quadrupled – topping $1 trillion.

Congress crafted legislation last month that would have allowed for refinancing of student loans at a lower rate, but it went nowhere – and President Obama’s recent executive action doesn’t full solve the problem.

Watch the video clip to find out how one city has been trying to solve the problem, and tune into the third installment of our Where America Works segment this Sunday on GPS.

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Topics: GPS Show
July 12th, 2014
03:56 PM ET

Bildt: EU, NATO expansion not reason for Ukraine tensions

Fareed speaks with former Swedish Prime Minster Carl Bildt, now the country’s foreign minister, about the recent tensions between Europe and Russia over Ukraine. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

You don’t buy the argument, I notice from your speech, that the Europeans in some way are responsible – or NATO is responsible – because over the last 20 years the European Union and NATO have expanded to Russia's borders. This is, of course the Russian claim, made by Putin in various speeches.

I don't buy anything of that. I mean the reality of it is that Ukraine, for all of its problems – and they are fairly massive – has been throughout its period of independence, has been a democratic country. And it has itself expressed the wish to have free trade and closer cooperation with the rest of the European countries, notably in the European Union. And we have answered that particular call. It would have been very difficult to refuse the Ukrainians. We have, perhaps, done less than they wanted – they want a much clearer European perspective from us.

They have free trade with Russia. We have no objections to that. And we’re now giving them free trade with the European Union. So we have answered the wishes of the Ukrainian people and the Moldovans and the Georgians and others. And that’s the thing you do in order to try to help a democracy that is trying to build a better future. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Russia • Ukraine
July 12th, 2014
03:13 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: A third intifada looming? And, why the Ukraine crisis isn't over yet

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: The escalation of violence between Israel and Hamas has made many wonder: Is this the dawn of the third intifada? And how does it relate to the other fires now burning in the Middle East?

Fareed convenes a panel to discuss the issue that includes Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass, Wall Street Journal columnist Bret Stephens, Shibley Telhami, author of The World Through Arab Eyes: Arab Public Opinion and the Reshaping of the Middle East, and Chrystia Freeland, a member of the Canadian parliament and former top editor at the Financial Times and Reuters.

And, the crisis between Russia and the West over Ukraine may not be making the headlines at the moment, but it is far from over says Sweden's foreign minister, Carl Bildt.

Plus, why was a French bank fined $9 billion by the U.S. government? Fareed explains how the United States is wielding a unique weapon that is the economic equivalent of a killer drone.

Also, Washington is dysfunctional and can't fix the student debt problem. But GPS will look at a place in America that has figured out a fix in the latest installment of our Where America Works series.

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Topics: GPS Show
A new map for the Middle East?
July 10th, 2014
03:35 PM ET

A new map for the Middle East?

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Robin Wright, author of Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World, about tensions in the Middle East.

You had a terrific piece in The New York Times a year ago that struck me in which you mapped out a new Middle East based on really, the realities of the ground. Describe for us what the new map of the Middle East looks like.

Well, in the aftermath of the Arab uprisings, we saw a kind of combustible situation emerge that allowed rival ethnicities and tribes and religions begin to fight for their rights with dictators now absent from the scene. And that exploded.

Syria, of course, lit the match. And we're now seeing Syria already at least into three different pieces. And that has been explosive in rippling across borders, challenging traditional boundaries established a century ago. We see that play out in Iraq today, where we see the emergence again of at least three different parts of the country – the Kurds particularly in the north, almost kind of de facto establishing their own boundary with the rest of Iraq by deploying Peshmerga, their own militia, along that border.

FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Middle East
Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues
July 9th, 2014
04:20 PM ET

Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

From Syria to Iraq to the fast deteriorating situation in Gaza, the prospects for stability in the Middle East are looking increasingly bleak. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has also had to contend with a newly assertive Russia, a rising China and a persistent threat from militant groups such as al Qaeda.

To help make sense of these challenges, understand what to look out for next, and to assess where U.S. foreign policy has gotten it right – and wrong – GPS host Fareed Zakaria will be answering readers’ questions on recent developments across the globe.

Please leave your questions for Fareed in the comments section below.

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Topics: Foreign Policy • GPS Show • United States
Zakaria: Flare-up in Gaza violence will be hard to stop
July 8th, 2014
10:27 AM ET

Zakaria: Flare-up in Gaza violence will be hard to stop

CNN speaks with Fareed Zakaria about the escalating violence in Gaza following the kidnappings and killings of Israeli and Palestinian teenagers in the past few weeks. This is an edited version of the transcript.

The fact that the teenager who was beaten by the Israeli Police, an American citizen – how much could that, or should that, change the U.S. posture on this unfolding very serious, potentially very deadly situation in the Middle East?

It changes it a lot. As you know, the way in which the United States reacts varies very dramatically depending on whether the people involved – whether killed, wounded, hurt – are American citizens or not. Now this means that the American embassy has to be involved. It means the State Department has to be involved. It means that potentially congressmen might get involved, senators might get involved.

And in general, there’s going to be a heightened media scrutiny, inevitably. And all of that’s going to make an already raw situation even more difficult to handle.

FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Israel • Middle East
July 5th, 2014
10:35 PM ET

Why America's embrace of soccer is a good thing

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Peter Beinart,associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York, about Ann Coulter’s suggestion that America’s growing interest in soccer is a sign of the nation's moral decay.

You say that people like Ann Coulter are worried about this and are distressed about it because it wears away at the fact that the United States has been a kind of country apart from essentially the entire rest of the world on this one issue, on this one sport.

Right. Ann Coulter basically believes that part of what makes America great is that America is fundamentally different from the rest of the world and she compares soccer to the metric system. If the rest of the world adopts it per se, it's a good thing if the United States stays apart from it.

And I think what you're seeing with soccer is that the willingness to embrace soccer and the willingness to allow America's new immigrants to remain soccer fans without that compromising their Americanism, reflects a shift in the United States.

We have a less nativist sports culture and we are more open, at least some groups in the United States – young people, immigrants, political liberals are more open to liking the same kinds of things that people in other countries do.Things don't have to be ours and ours alone. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Sports
July 5th, 2014
09:52 PM ET

Where America Works: How Sioux Falls is creating jobs

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

The national unemployment rate, which is hovering around 6 percent, may be the lowest it’s been in more than 5 years, but about 10 million Americans are still without jobs. What’s more, only 63 percent of working age Americans have a job or are looking for one – the lowest level of workforce participation since 1978.

But there's a city that’s spurring economic development...and it has an unemployment rate that is about half the national average. To find out more about what has been behind the job boom for Sioux Falls, watch the video clip and tune into the second part of the Where America Works segment this Sunday on GPS.

 

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Topics: GPS Show
July 4th, 2014
02:44 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Where will Middle East turmoil lead? And, how effective are drones?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: The show will start with the Middle East, where Iraq has exploded into civil war, Syria's own war has intensified and the Israelis and the Palestinians are once again facing off. How does this all end? With new states all together or just unending violence?  Fareed will speak with Robin Wright, author of Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World, and Fawaz Gerges, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics.

“Barack Obama is correct to basically keep a distance from the killing fields in the Middle East,” Gerges says. “Barack Obama is correct to let the region develop its own instruments of government. The reality is this is a crisis that only people in the region should and can resolve.”

Then...Can the U.S. fight against terrorists with just spies and drones? Fareed will hear from Jack Devine, whose stints with the CIA included acting director and associate director of overseas operations, and Greg Johnsen, a journalist, scholar and expert on the use of drones.

Also, despite being ousted from the World Cup, the United States has become a soccer nation. Ann Coulter says it's a scary sign of a new America. Peter Beinart suggests she's half right.

Then, Washington D.C. is broken, but America is actually working surprising well. In the second in our Where America Works series, GPS takes you to a place with an unemployment rate half the national average. How does this city do it?

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Topics: GPS Show
June 28th, 2014
10:32 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: The costs of the climate crisis, and are we facing 1914 redux?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday, Fareed speaks with two former treasury secretaries, Henry Paulson and Robert Rubin, about the coming costs of the climate crisis. For more on the issue watch the video clip or read Paulson’s New York Times opinion piece ‘The Coming Climate Crash.’

Then, why might Muqtada al-Sadr’s army be playing spoiler in Iraq, again?

Next, are we reliving 1914? On the 100th anniversary of the assassination that sparked World War I, Fareed explores the geopolitical similarities and differences with former CIA Deputy Director John McLaughlin, author of the recent op-ed ‘How 2014 Is Strikingly Similar to 1914,’ Geoffrey Wawro, author of A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire, and Walter Russell Mead, professor of foreign affairs at Bard College.

And, introducing a new GPS series: Where America Works. Washington, DC may be broken, but intractable problems are being solved in towns across America. First stop: Houston’s immigration solutions.

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Topics: GPS Show
America's lowly minimum wage
June 25th, 2014
02:00 PM ET

America's lowly minimum wage

Last week, the IMF urged the U.S. to raise the wage floor, saying it is low by both historical and international standards. The federal minimum wage in America was about 38 percent of the median wage in 2011, one of lowest percentages among the rich countries of the world.

For Fareed's take on how to tackle poverty, watch our latest What in the World.

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Topics: GPS Show
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