Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues
July 9th, 2014
04:20 PM ET

Fareed taking readers' questions on global issues

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

From Syria to Iraq to the fast deteriorating situation in Gaza, the prospects for stability in the Middle East are looking increasingly bleak. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has also had to contend with a newly assertive Russia, a rising China and a persistent threat from militant groups such as al Qaeda.

To help make sense of these challenges, understand what to look out for next, and to assess where U.S. foreign policy has gotten it right – and wrong – GPS host Fareed Zakaria will be answering readers’ questions on recent developments across the globe.

Please leave your questions for Fareed in the comments section below.

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Topics: Foreign Policy • GPS Show • United States
Zakaria: Flare-up in Gaza violence will be hard to stop
July 8th, 2014
10:27 AM ET

Zakaria: Flare-up in Gaza violence will be hard to stop

CNN speaks with Fareed Zakaria about the escalating violence in Gaza following the kidnappings and killings of Israeli and Palestinian teenagers in the past few weeks. This is an edited version of the transcript.

The fact that the teenager who was beaten by the Israeli Police, an American citizen – how much could that, or should that, change the U.S. posture on this unfolding very serious, potentially very deadly situation in the Middle East?

It changes it a lot. As you know, the way in which the United States reacts varies very dramatically depending on whether the people involved – whether killed, wounded, hurt – are American citizens or not. Now this means that the American embassy has to be involved. It means the State Department has to be involved. It means that potentially congressmen might get involved, senators might get involved.

And in general, there’s going to be a heightened media scrutiny, inevitably. And all of that’s going to make an already raw situation even more difficult to handle.

FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Israel • Middle East
July 5th, 2014
10:35 PM ET

Why America's embrace of soccer is a good thing

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Peter Beinart,associate professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York, about Ann Coulter’s suggestion that America’s growing interest in soccer is a sign of the nation's moral decay.

You say that people like Ann Coulter are worried about this and are distressed about it because it wears away at the fact that the United States has been a kind of country apart from essentially the entire rest of the world on this one issue, on this one sport.

Right. Ann Coulter basically believes that part of what makes America great is that America is fundamentally different from the rest of the world and she compares soccer to the metric system. If the rest of the world adopts it per se, it's a good thing if the United States stays apart from it.

And I think what you're seeing with soccer is that the willingness to embrace soccer and the willingness to allow America's new immigrants to remain soccer fans without that compromising their Americanism, reflects a shift in the United States.

We have a less nativist sports culture and we are more open, at least some groups in the United States – young people, immigrants, political liberals are more open to liking the same kinds of things that people in other countries do.Things don't have to be ours and ours alone. FULL POST

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Topics: GPS Show • Sports
July 5th, 2014
09:52 PM ET

Where America Works: How Sioux Falls is creating jobs

Watch"Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

The national unemployment rate, which is hovering around 6 percent, may be the lowest it’s been in more than 5 years, but about 10 million Americans are still without jobs. What’s more, only 63 percent of working age Americans have a job or are looking for one – the lowest level of workforce participation since 1978.

But there's a city that’s spurring economic development...and it has an unemployment rate that is about half the national average. To find out more about what has been behind the job boom for Sioux Falls, watch the video clip and tune into the second part of the Where America Works segment this Sunday on GPS.

 

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Topics: GPS Show
July 4th, 2014
02:44 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Where will Middle East turmoil lead? And, how effective are drones?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: The show will start with the Middle East, where Iraq has exploded into civil war, Syria's own war has intensified and the Israelis and the Palestinians are once again facing off. How does this all end? With new states all together or just unending violence?  Fareed will speak with Robin Wright, author of Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World, and Fawaz Gerges, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics.

“Barack Obama is correct to basically keep a distance from the killing fields in the Middle East,” Gerges says. “Barack Obama is correct to let the region develop its own instruments of government. The reality is this is a crisis that only people in the region should and can resolve.”

Then...Can the U.S. fight against terrorists with just spies and drones? Fareed will hear from Jack Devine, whose stints with the CIA included acting director and associate director of overseas operations, and Greg Johnsen, a journalist, scholar and expert on the use of drones.

Also, despite being ousted from the World Cup, the United States has become a soccer nation. Ann Coulter says it's a scary sign of a new America. Peter Beinart suggests she's half right.

Then, Washington D.C. is broken, but America is actually working surprising well. In the second in our Where America Works series, GPS takes you to a place with an unemployment rate half the national average. How does this city do it?

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Topics: GPS Show
June 28th, 2014
10:32 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: The costs of the climate crisis, and are we facing 1914 redux?

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday, Fareed speaks with two former treasury secretaries, Henry Paulson and Robert Rubin, about the coming costs of the climate crisis. For more on the issue watch the video clip or read Paulson’s New York Times opinion piece ‘The Coming Climate Crash.’

Then, why might Muqtada al-Sadr’s army be playing spoiler in Iraq, again?

Next, are we reliving 1914? On the 100th anniversary of the assassination that sparked World War I, Fareed explores the geopolitical similarities and differences with former CIA Deputy Director John McLaughlin, author of the recent op-ed ‘How 2014 Is Strikingly Similar to 1914,’ Geoffrey Wawro, author of A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire, and Walter Russell Mead, professor of foreign affairs at Bard College.

And, introducing a new GPS series: Where America Works. Washington, DC may be broken, but intractable problems are being solved in towns across America. First stop: Houston’s immigration solutions.

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Topics: GPS Show
America's lowly minimum wage
June 25th, 2014
02:00 PM ET

America's lowly minimum wage

Last week, the IMF urged the U.S. to raise the wage floor, saying it is low by both historical and international standards. The federal minimum wage in America was about 38 percent of the median wage in 2011, one of lowest percentages among the rich countries of the world.

For Fareed's take on how to tackle poverty, watch our latest What in the World.

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Topics: GPS Show
June 24th, 2014
05:15 PM ET

How LBJ got the Civil Rights Act passed

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

The Civil Rights Act remains one of the great puzzles and achievements of American history. The achievement part is obvious. The puzzle part is two-fold.  First: why did it take so long?  It passed 101 years after President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. And second: how did it finally get passed?

To get the answers, let’s step back 50 years. It's hard for young people today to imagine, but back then there were restaurants and stores and cabs – mostly in the South – where black people were not served. There were separate water fountains for the two races and, as Rosa Parks made infamous, separate sections of buses, just to name a few. It was legal in 1964 to refuse to hire somebody because of the color of their skin or their gender. A year earlier, President John F. Kennedy had addressed the nation to urge action on civil rights.

But then Kennedy was assassinated. Surprisingly, his successor Lyndon Baines Johnson, a staunch Southerner, took up the cause, a cause that looked hopeless.

Why? Johnson biographer Robert Caro explains.

For more on the issue, tune into CNN's 'The Sixties' as it explores the civil rights movement in-depth, this Thursday at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

 

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Topics: GPS Show • History • Politics • United States
June 23rd, 2014
11:59 AM ET

Grenier: Iraq needs change of leadership

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

Fareed speaks with Robert Grenier, the CIA's Iraq mission manager from 2002 to 2004 and director of the CIA's Counterterrorism Center from 2004 to 2006, about Iraq’s future.

Robert, you've dealt with these people. Is it possible for the Sunnis of Iraq to trust the al-Maliki government, even if he did make some concessions, even if he did make some outreach? If you were a Sunni leader in Iraq – you've watched what Maliki has done for the last four or five years – are you going to buy it? Are you going to be willing to get in bed with him? It just feels to me like the prospect of national reconciliation, at this point, is remote.

I agree with that. I think it's going to be very, very important for a replacement to be found for Nuri al-Maliki. And I think it's very important for the Americans to be speaking quietly with the Iranians. You know, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq Jim Jeffrey has a very nice phrase for this. He says that the Iranian interest in Iraq is to keep the Sunnis down, the Kurds in and the Americans out. And right now, al-Maliki is not serving any of their agenda items.

I think that they will agree, once the current crisis has past, that this man needs to be replaced. I think we have to have a substantial presence on the ground to give us the influence that we need to work, again, indirectly, in conjunction with the Iranians who share some interests with us to make sure that there's a change of leadership in Baghdad.

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Topics: GPS Show • Iraq
June 23rd, 2014
11:23 AM ET

U.S. needs enclave strategy for Iraq

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

By Fareed Zakaria

Let’s be honest, Iraq's Shia (like the Sunni Islamists of Syria) had been brutally suppressed by dictators for decades. It was always going to be hard for them to sign up peacefully to share power with their former tormentors.

Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's reign of terror against the Sunnis has suddenly ensured that the Sunnis will never really trust him – and they are likely never to trust the parties he represents – to rule over them. As Washington supports the Baghdad government it will have to be extremely careful not to be seen as taking sides in a sectarian conflict and to press for political reform and inclusiveness even as it offers Baghdad military support.

But Washington should recognize that national harmony in Iraq, everyone singing Kumbaya, is highly unlikely. It needs a Plan B. Call it an enclave strategy – the world might have to accept that Iraq is turning into a country of enclaves and work to ensure that these regions stay as stable, terror-free, and open as is possible…

…Now, there will be enclaves where ISIS and similar groups gain some strength. In these areas, Washington would have to use drones, counter-intelligence, and occasional Special Forces strikes – just as it does in parts of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia.

Watch the video for the full Take or read the WaPo column

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Topics: GPS Show • Iraq
June 21st, 2014
09:19 PM ET

German defense minister: Putin trampled on international rules

Fareed speaks with German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen about the situation in Ukraine and how to respond to Russia. Watch the full interview this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN.

Do you believe that Vladimir Putin has been deterred, that Russia is now content with the situation in Ukraine as it is? What is your best information from the Russian-Ukrainian border?

Well, he didn't do that by chance. He didn’t do this annexation of Crimea out of the blue, but it seemed to have been a long-term strategic plan to have this intervention in Crimea to have the annexation of the Crimea. And all of a sudden it seems forgotten that Putin trampled on international rules and laws and ignored the sovereignty of Ukraine. So, we should not forget about that.

But something happened where I think Putin did not count on. All of a sudden, there was a growing solidarity and unity in the West, in NATO, Europe and America, to stop him by the means we chose that are economic sanctions. And I think this is the right way to go.

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Topics: GPS Show
June 21st, 2014
08:45 PM ET

On GPS Sunday: Analysis on Iraq, and Germany's defense minister talks Ukraine

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN

On GPS this Sunday: First, Fareed will get the latest from CNN correspondents on the ground in Iraq before hearing from an all-star panel about the U.S. plan – and if there's anything America can do that will actually help. Retired General Anthony Zinni, former top U.S. counterterrorism official Richard Clarke and Robert Grenier, former director of the CIA's Counterterrorism Center, all weigh in.

“Now, if we support the government in Baghdad, it will be seen in some parts of the Middle East, that we're supporting the Iranians and the Shia in Iraq, as well, at the expense of the Sunni,” Clarke says. “We have to remember that the goal here is not military. The goal is political.”

Also, the other crisis – in Ukraine.  Fareed will speak with Germany's defense minister about punishing Putin.  Does Europe have the stomach for more pressure?

Then, how a persuasive president who loved politics got an extremely controversial piece of legislation passed. Fareed speaks with Pulitzer Prize winning writer Robert Caro about the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, a milestone in American history.

Finally, how to crown a king when you're pinching pennies – Spain showed us the way this week.

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Topics: GPS Show
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