Kenyan tribe donates cows to America
September 11th, 2013
10:07 AM ET

Remembering 9/11: A warrior's unexpected gift to America

By Tom Goldstone, CNN

Editor's Note: Tom Goldstone is the executive producer of Fareed Zakaria GPS. This article originally appeared in September 2011. The views expressed are his own.

As America looked inward in the days, weeks and months after September 11, 2001, others around the world made extraordinary gestures toward the United States. 
We were all so focused on ourselves – understandably so – that many probably missed the fact that Iran’s President Mohammad Khatami condemned the attacks, that Ireland and Israel held full national days of mourning, that the Afghan Taliban told “American children [that] Afghanistan feels your pain”.

You are even less likely to have heard what could be one of the most touching reactions of all.  This is the story of how a destitute Kenyan boy turned Stanford student rallied his Masai tribe to offer its most precious gift to America in its time of need. FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Africa • September 11
Health of Muslims, Arab Americans another victim of 9/11
September 11th, 2012
03:28 PM ET

Health of Muslims, Arab Americans another victim of 9/11

By Abdul El-Sayed & Aasim I. Padela, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Abdul El-Sayed  is an epidemiologist at Columbia University and a fellow at Demos. Aasim I. Padela is assistant professor and director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine at the University of Chicago and a fellow at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. The views expressed are their own.

More than a decade after September 11, 2001 and we are only now really beginning to comprehend the health fallout from the terrorist attacks. The effects suffered by first-responders and those who lived in downtown New York City have become increasingly clear, and have rightly been the subject of much attention. Indeed, only yesterday it was announced that 58 cancers had been added to the list of illnesses covered in the wake of 9/11. Yet, the health fallout of 9/11 was not limited to those who were near the World Trade Center or the Pentagon that day.

Health researchers have been compiling a list of health problems that they believe are directly and indirectly connected to 9/11. There are, of course, the more obvious problems – physicians and epidemiologists have, for example, noted unusually high rates of uncommon cancers among 9/11 survivors and rescue personnel, while the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder have unsurprisingly been high since the tragedy, even among those who did not directly experience the trauma of those events.

FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Health • Islam • September 11 • United States
Al-Qaeda diminished, but not gone
September 11th, 2012
11:35 AM ET

Al-Qaeda diminished, but not gone

By Fareed Zakaria

A few years after 9/11, I began to make the point – in columns, books and of television – that the threat from al-Qaeda had diminished substantially. Al-Qaeda had flourished in an age when governments regarded it as a sporadic annoyance rather than a major national security challenge. After 9/11, governments around the world began collaborating to track its people, stop its money flows, and eliminate it camps. Once that process was underway, al-Qaeda found it much harder to operate under the radar screen and plot its mayhem.

Today, 11 years after 9/11, it is clearer than ever that al-Qaeda is a shadow of its former self. So much so that there may now be a danger of complacency. Serious experts and scholars, like Bruce Riedel, argue that al-Qaeda has been able to reconstitute itself in places like Yemen, Somalia, and even Mali. The Pakistani connection remains strong. And the growing chaos in Syria has presented the group with an opportunity to make inroads there as well.

FULL POST

September 13th, 2011
10:00 AM ET

3 post-9/11 stages to Arab views of America

Editor's Note: Sami Moubayed is a university professor, political analyst and Editor-in-Chief of Forward Magazine in Syria.

By Sami Moubayed - Special to CNN

Over the last decade, there have been three stages to Arab views of America.

Stage 1: Sympathy for the American people

Right after 9-11, the Arab street was divided. Some were gloating that the Americans were now getting a dose of their own medicine, given that 9/11 looked like something that would have happened in Ramallah or Beirut, but not New York City. The majority, however, were horrified by the tragic loss of life, and the atrocity of the terrorist attack. It was sheer madness and brutal, and it contradicted everything that Islam stood for. Those who committed the 9/11 attacks had hijacked Islam, after all, and Osama Bin baden, who claimed to be a Muslim freedom fighter, had actually done Islam the greatest disservice in 1,400 years. 9-11 created sympathy for the American people, but not sympathy for the American government, which at the time was headed by none other than George W. Bush. FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Perspectives • September 11
September 11th, 2011
04:38 PM ET

Fareed's Take: Reflections on 9/11

By Fareed Zakaria, CNN

Those of us who live in New York have our own special memories of 9/11/2001. I was driving down the Long Island Expressway, about to begin a month-long leave from my job at Newsweek, to work on a book. Around 9 am, I switched from the CD player to the radio to listen to the news. The reports were chaotic but the outlines of what had happened were clear. I turned around and headed back to New York to get to my wife and one-year old boy. As I approached the Triborough Bridge I saw huge barricades and dozens of police cars. All bridges and tunnels were closed. Manhattan had been sealed off.

I got back 12 hours later, put my book project on hold and spent all my spare hours reading and thinking about what had caused the attack - what explained this monstrous evil? That's how 9/11 was discussed and analyzed at the time - mostly with a focus on them. Who are they? Why are they so enraged? What do they want? What will stop them from hating us? FULL POST

Remembering 9/11: Reflections from Jordan
The view from Alden's window in Jordan. (Courtesy: Alden Mahler Levine)
September 11th, 2011
04:30 PM ET

Remembering 9/11: Reflections from Jordan

Editor's Note: Alden Mahler Levine is a researcher at CNN International. She blogs at Red Pen Brigade. The following is her recollection about hearing of 9/11 while living in Jordan.

By Alden Mahler Levine, CNN

It is hot, and I am tired. I am the kind of tired I get when I have to pack – the frustrated, anxious tired. Tired of having to think, make decisions, process, plan. It has been a very long week, fraught with social tension. The weight of my leaving hangs over me at all times like a gloomy raincloud, every bit as likely to burst into rainy tears at any moment.

Keep going, I encourage myself. Pack a little more. If you can focus for thirty more minutes, you can take a break. If you can focus, you can sit for half an hour and watch “The Bold and the Beautiful.” FULL POST

Listen up, America! What the world is saying about the anniversary of September 11
(Getty Images)
September 9th, 2011
11:30 PM ET

Listen up, America! What the world is saying about the anniversary of September 11

Editor's Note: Every week, the Global Public Square brings you some must-read editorials from around the world addressed to America and Americans. The series is called Listen up, America! This week we look at what papers around the world are saying about the anniversary of September 11 - from conspiracy theories in Saudi Arabia to exasperated calls from China to foreboding messages in Australia.

Australia – “The paradox of 9/11 is that it may yet be overwhelmed by the 2008 global financial crisis as a long-term blow to U.S. power, authority and self-esteem,” writes Paul Kelly, editor-at-large of the Sydney-based Australian.

“The extent of U.S. economic self-harm may exceed the harm from al Qaeda's lethal strike a decade ago. The irony is that Australia, tied to the U.S. in security terms, is divorced from the U.S. in economic terms and has escaped the internal economic crises that plague the U.S. and Europe.”

FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Global • Listen up! • Perspectives • September 11 • United States
Zakaria: Reflections on 9/11 and its aftermath
September 9th, 2011
06:00 AM ET

Zakaria: Reflections on 9/11 and its aftermath

Editor's Note: Tune in this Sunday in the U.S. at 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. for a special edition of GPS: "9/11 and the World".  (If you're watching internationally, tune in Sunday at 4 p.m. ET, 8 p.m. ET and Monday 7 a.m. ET.) Fareed will have a one-on-one with former U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and an expert panel on how the world has changed - and not - since September 11, 2001.

By Fareed Zakaria, CNN

Those of us who live in New York have our own special memories of 9/11/2001. I was driving down the Long Island Expressway, about to begin a month-long leave from my job at Newsweek to work on a book. Around 9 a.m., I switched from the CD player to the radio to listen to the news. The reports were chaotic but the outlines of what had happened were clear. I turned around and headed back to New York to get to my wife and 1-year-old boy. As I approached the Triborough Bridge I saw huge barricades and dozens of police cars. All bridges and tunnels were closed. Manhattan had been sealed off. Cell phones were useless that morning because 8 million people were trying to use them simultaneously and the result was cellular gridlock.

I turned around and headed to my destination in Long Island, the home of friends where I had been planning to work on the book.  As soon as I got there, I turned on CNN and watched with horror and anger. Finally, I was able to talk to my wife and knew that she and my son were fine. But soon I got a call from one of my dearest friends, my roommate from college. His brother, Chris, worked on one the high floors of the Towers. No one had heard from him. I began calling friends and contacts at the New York Police Department, the FBI, the CIA - anyone who might have any ideas about what I might do to help. I remember looking at the hospital emergency rooms, with beds set up on the streets, waiting for patients to come streaming in. But, of course, they were all empty. No one ever came. Chris was never heard from again. FULL POST

September 8th, 2011
05:16 PM ET

One in four Americans say lives permanently changed by 9/11

By Jeffrey M. Jones, Gallup.com

Ten years after the 9/11 terror attacks, 28% of Americans say they have permanently changed the way they live as a result of that tragedy. More, 58%, believe that Americans overall have permanently changed the way they live.

Have Americans permanently changed the way they live as a result of that tragedy?

FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Poll • September 11 • United States
Ten years after the mouse roared
Harvard professor Joseph Nye.
September 1st, 2011
11:55 AM ET

Ten years after the mouse roared

Editor's Note: Joseph S. Nye, Jr, a former US assistant secretary of defense, is a professor at Harvard and the author of The Future of PowerFor more from Nye, visit Project Syndicate or follow it on Facebook and Twitter.

By Joseph S. Nye, Project Syndicate

Al Qaeda’s attack on the United States ten years ago was a profound shock to both American and international public opinion. What lessons can we learn a decade later?

Anyone who flies or tries to visit a Washington office building gets a reminder of how American security was changed by 9/11. But, while concern about terrorism is greater, and immigration restrictions are tighter, the hysteria of the early days after 9/11 has abated. New agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security, the Director of National Intelligence and an upgraded Counter Terrorism Center have not transformed American government, and, for most Americans, personal freedoms have been little affected. No more large-scale attacks have occurred inside the U.S., and everyday life has recovered well. FULL POST

Post by:
Topics: Foreign Policy • September 11 • Strategy • Terrorism • United States