Regional multilateralism: The next paradigm in global affairs
French President Nicolas Sarkozy gestures as German Changellor Angela Merkel, U.S.President Barack Obama and China Prime Minister Hu Jintao pose for a group photo session at the G20 Summit on November 3, 2011 in Cannes, France. (Getty Images)
January 14th, 2012
02:17 PM ET

Regional multilateralism: The next paradigm in global affairs

Editor's Note: Harris Mylonas is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University and Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. Emirhan Yorulmazlar is Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University.

By Harris Mylonas and Emirhan Yorulmazlar - Special to CNN

The Cold War and the early post-Cold War periods were relatively easy to define and comprehend. The first was roughly the struggle between two superpowers forming a bipolar system where almost every state had to choose a side. What followed was a period described by Fukuyama as “The End of History” announcing the triumph of liberal ideas. The US was a global hegemon: selecting when to intervene, expanding NATO’s reach, and dominating international institutions. Following the 9/11 attacks unilateralism was exposed and thereafter multilateralism appeared - with its limitations. Today, “regional multilateralism” may be the next paradigm that can bring about peace, cooperation, and stability in global affairs. FULL POST

What really went wrong in Greece?
A girl waves the Greek flag at a rally in Syntagma Square, in front of the Greek Parliament, on May 29, 2011 in Athens, Greece. Estimates claim over 100,000 people attended the protest against new austerity measures, which was organized for a fifth consecutive day through a Facebook group called 'The Indignant' following similar demonstrations in Spain. (Getty Images)
November 20th, 2011
08:00 PM ET

What really went wrong in Greece?

Editor’s Note: Evan Liaras is the Davis Post-Doctoral Fellow in European Studies at the Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University. Harris Mylonas is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University and Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies.

By Evan Liaras and Harris Mylonas - Special to CNN

After reading about the Greek debt crisis for over a year now, you might think you understand what it’s all about. You’re probably wrong. International media focus on how the Greek government and people spend their money. But an equally important problem is the inability of the Greek state to collect revenues.

The story constantly aired by various news outlets is simple enough. Greece, we are told, free-rode on the security offered by the rest of Europe to attract money from foreign investors, and then spent it lavishly on its bloated public sector. In case you don’t get it, BBC’s website has a recurring instructional slide show titled “What went wrong in Greece?” Apparently, Greece’s adoption of the euro “made it easier for the country to borrow money.... Greece went on a big, debt-funded spending spree, including paying for high-profile projects such as the 2004 Athens Olympics.” FULL POST

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Topics: Debt Crisis • Greece
November 3rd, 2011
07:08 PM ET

Greece's legitimacy crisis

Editor's Note: Thomas Meaney is a doctoral candidate in history at Columbia University and an editor of The Utopian. Harris Mylonas is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University and an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. The views expressed in this article are solely those of Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas.

By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas – Special to CNN

In the past 48 hours, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou has succeeded in one thing: Stirring up the anger of nearly everyone around him. The European Union, his own party PASOK, the opposition party New Democracy and the Greek electorate are all pitted against Papandreou. The Greeks have a word for this special brand of rage - they call it “thymos”. This refers to the simmering resentment that arises when one's views are not recognized.

It’s little wonder Papandreou has had to back down from his initial call for a national referendum on the 50% haircut deal decided by the European Union heads of state on October 27.

First off, he failed to get the opposition to agree to the referendum. They called it blackmail, denounced Papandreou as an opportunist and asked for a grand coalition government or immediate elections. Main opposition leader Antonis Samaras’ consensus on Thursday was short-lived and with many conditions. FULL POST

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Topics: Economy • Elections • Europe • Greece
November 2nd, 2011
07:45 AM ET

Are Greece's leaders being reckless or bold?

Editor's Note: Thomas Meaney is a doctoral candidate in history at Columbia University and an editor of The Utopian. Harris Mylonas is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University and an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies.

By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas - Special to CNN

Call it reckless, call it bold, but the Greek Prime Minister, George Papandreou, has attempted to transform a referendum on the European Union bailout plan for Greece into a referendum about whether the Greeks want to stay in the Eurozone or not. The last time Greece had a popular referendum was in 1974 to decide if the people wanted to keep King Constantine, a descendent of the Royal family that European Powers foisted on the Greek people in the 1860s.

This time around, the Greek Prime Minister has shocked the rest of Europe — and even his own Vice President —with his plans to call for a popular vote on whether to accept the 50% haircut deal that EU heads of state agreed on last week to manage the country’s spiraling debt crisis. It’s the latest in a series of Hail Mary passes by Papandreou to keep his hold on power, but the proposed referendum is really only a distraction from the no-confidence vote he faces, which is scheduled in Greek Parliament this Friday. As hard as the Europeans leaders may have fought to prevent a Greek default, they failed to take into account the dire state of domestic Greek politics. But even at this moment the solution to the crisis must be a European one.

FULL POST

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Topics: Debt Crisis • Europe • Greece
June 17th, 2011
06:06 PM ET

Analysis of Greece's cabinet reshuffle

Editor's Note: Harris Mylonas is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The Elliott School of International Affairs & Department of Political Science at George Washington University. He is also an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies.

By Harris Mylonas – Special to CNN

Three weeks of peaceful street protests; a couple of Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK) members of parliament resigning this week; a few more PASOK members of parliament challenging the leadership qualities of Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou; rampant unemployment; violent clashes with the police; and one of the worst financial crises in modern Greek history culminated today in...a cabinet reshuffle. FULL POST

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Topics: Economy • Europe • Politics