A Saudi perspective on the alleged Iranian plot
Saudi convoy headed to Bahrain. (Bahrain TV)
October 25th, 2011
12:05 PM ET

A Saudi perspective on the alleged Iranian plot

Editor's Note: Nawaf Obaid is a Senior Fellow at the King Faisal Center for Research & Islamic Studies based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He recently wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post entitled, Why Saudi Arabia is stable amid the Mideast unrest. Previously, Obaid was also private security and energy advisor Nawaf Obaid to Prince Turki al-Faisal when al-Faisal was the Saudi Ambassador to the United States.

By Nawaf Obaid – Special to CNN

RIYADH - The alleged Iranian plot to assassinate the Saudi Ambassador to the U.S. and bomb embassies around the world was not only a flagrant violation of international law and norms, but also a sign of the fury and desperation the Mullahs in Tehran feel in the face of strong Saudi support for Bahrain.

This March, after the Kingdom sent troops to the island nation to protect against the violent uprising, Iran’s leadership could only watch helplessly as its plans to overthrow the monarchy and establish a Shia proxy state there were quashed. The recently revealed terror plot was a direct response to this act, and sheds light on the role that Bahrain plays in Iranian plans to further its influence throughout the region.

In fact, Ghulam Shakuri, the Iranian military officer in charge of covert operations against the Bahraini government, was named in the U.S. affidavit outlining the foiled attacks. Thus, the plot against Saudi Arabia and the turmoil in Bahrain are linked and represent only the latest stage in Iran’s decades-long campaign to export its militant ideology and assert its influence throughout the region. Because of the threat Iran’s clearly poses to peace and stability in the Middle East, the Kingdom will do everything necessary to stop its meddling in Bahrain, even if that means going to war. FULL POST

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Topics: Iran • Saudi Arabia
A Saudi perspective on the Arab uprisings
Saudi security forces march during a military parade at a base near Mount Arafat, southeast of the holy city of Mecca, on November 22, 2009.
June 8th, 2011
03:45 PM ET

A Saudi perspective on the Arab uprisings

Editor's Note: Nawaf Obaid is a Senior Fellow at the King Faisal Center for Research & Islamic Studies based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He recently wrote an op-ed for The Washington Post entitled, Why Saudi Arabia is stable amid the Mideast unrest. Previously, Obaid was also private security and energy advisor Nawaf Obaid to Prince Turki al-Faisal when al-Faisal was the Saudi Ambassador to the United States.

By Nawaf Obaid – Special to CNN

The Arab world faces a period of historic upheaval: The economic and social malaise that existed in Tunisia before the revolution remains, and there is no realistic plan to turn the situation around.

Egypt's economy is in free-fall and the Muslim Brotherhood is poised to significantly increase its power through upcoming elections.

Civil war in Libya and escalating violence in Yemen have cost thousands of lives and set back development by decades.

Syria is on the edge of an abyss of nightmarish internecine warfare, which could spill into Lebanon, Turkey and Iraq.

The so-called "Arab Spring" has not brought new life to the Middle East, but leaderless anarchy, creating a virtual pan-regional movement that is alarmingly dangerous and ultimately unsustainable. FULL POST

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Topics: Middle East • Military • Oil • Saudi Arabia