Global masses demand accountability
October 11th, 2011
09:28 PM ET

Global masses demand accountability

Editor's Note: Parag Khanna is a senior research fellow at the New America Foundation, visiting senior fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and author of The Second World and How to Run the World.

By Parag Khanna – Special to CNN

Times Square will not turn into Tahrir Square anytime soon, despite the very interesting parallels between the Occupy Wall Street movement and the Arab Spring recently laid out by Joshua Keating in Foreign Policy.

Yet New York, Cairo, Tel Aviv, New Delhi, London and Madrid have all become sites of popular discontent with democracies that don’t deliver the basics, especially jobs and justice. As Nicholas Kulish recently reported in the New York Times, “protesters share something else: wariness, even contempt, toward traditional politicians and the democratic political process they preside over. They are taking to the streets, in part, because they have little faith in the ballot box.”

The most fundamental feature of the international system we are experiencing is the collapse of the post-colonial order. Post-colonial Arab nations survived for decades on anti-Western rhetoric and Cold War largesse, but are now succumbing to decades of decay evident in their over-population, crumbling infrastructure and corrupt leadership.

At the founding of the United Nations six decades ago, the world had only 80 nations. Today it has close to 200, most of which are post-colonial nations born out of the remnants of European empires. And most of those nations have the same poor underlying social and political health as the Arab world. The Arab Spring, then, could easily replicate itself in dozens more societies.

The weaknesses of governance that motivate protest movements - whether in the economic or social spheres - are common across democracies and non-democracies. Witness India, both the world’s largest democracy but also ranking in the bottom quarter of Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index. Anna Hazare’s hunger strike protesting rampant corruption paralyzed New Delhi and nearly brought the fragile government to its knees.

What this reminds us is that accountability - not democracy - is the highest virtue in governance. Citizens want outcomes and results, not just elections. Democracy is just one way to achieve accountable governance, but it is not the only way, and it is not always effective. Rather than reach the “End of History,” the competition among diverse models of accountability is intensifying.

All around the world, the most respected model today - by leaps and bounds - appears to be Singapore. Though it is difficult to replicate the efficiency of a city-state in large nations, there is no reason why low corruption, responsive policies and far-sighted economic planning cannot be pursued by other governments.

Whether the blame for the current political malaise visible from America to Europe to the Middle East lies with the flaws of majoritarian democracy or hijacked capitalism, governments around the world should take note that today, for the first time, the under-represented and disenfranchised have access to information, communication, money and the tools of nonviolent revolution to demand and effect real change, not just new variations on the status quo. They will constantly pressure the system to evolve in more responsive directions. Governments will either adapt or be pushed out of the way. Democracy alone will save no one.

The views expressed in this article are solely those of Parag Khanna.

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Topics: Global • Protests

soundoff (54 Responses)
  1. That guy

    Ooh, am i really first?!

    October 11, 2011 at 10:05 pm | Reply
  2. That guy

    Wow, what an honor! Um, okay, lemme get this right...I think that corporations...uh...media...um...the government...um...

    October 11, 2011 at 10:06 pm | Reply
  3. 911 was

    911 was an inside job. This country sucks. Tesla proved you can run cars on water. Look up HHO gas. There are cars running on salt water right now. Where is the anti-trust suit to break up the oil monopolies and implement free energy. Its like the old business saying... "how do we survive?....We make them need us..." We don't need gas for homes, cars or businesses...only water. BREAK the oil monopolies and free the planet. Stop the pollution. Stop the wars... Put the middle east out of business and stop the terror. IT ALL GOES AWAY.. if you free the planet by freeing its energy. 911 didn't even need to happen. Break the prison, free the world.

    October 11, 2011 at 10:36 pm | Reply
  4. Do Your Homework First

    Umm... Singapore? The place where the current president only won 30% of the vote? Where 40% of the populace is represented by 7% of the members of parliament? Where there has been no accountability for high profile scandals like losses from the Youth Olympic Games, the renaming of Marina Bay to Marina Bay, and the escape of a major wanted terrorist? Where legalized casinos were pushed through despite the opposition of the general public? Where opposition politicians were disqualified from running in elections for a technicality, but technicalities that should have disqualified the ruling PAP were ignored?

    Singapore isn't exactly a model of accountability. Nor is it a model for low corruption, or responsive policies. The country happens to be in recession and has one of the highest GINI coefficients (gaps between rich and poor)- Kenya and Thailand have better income equality than Singapore. The Singapore GINI is comparable to Iran. Its a model for how to stay in power. Seriously, Parag, do some research before you write.

    October 11, 2011 at 10:36 pm | Reply
    • 911 was

      The have the best health care system in the world.

      October 11, 2011 at 10:38 pm | Reply
      • Mike Houston

        Yeah...and they have a "healthy" market for Chinese originated human organs for transplant, too.
        Very admirable, that is...Gotta love Singapore's "health care", don't we...

        October 12, 2011 at 5:03 pm |
    • Roger

      I agree with you, Singapore is a place where they cane you to within an inch of your life for something that in a normal country is not even an offense. A country that is more corrupt politically and morally than any other I have ever visited. This author is indeed crazy.

      October 12, 2011 at 3:15 am | Reply
    • Singaporean

      Have you EVER been to Singapore or do you get your narrow minded, western opinions from the mass media? I live in Singapore and it is by far the cleanest, safest, most vibrant city I've ever been to. You can walk in the streets in any place in Singapore and not have to fear for your life, or being mugged, gunned down, attacked by drug addicts, etc. There is a vibrant arts scene and political debate here, and it is narrow minded to comment on politics here unless you truly understand it. How is the American system better, where the House, Senate, President are locked in eternal political deadlock with no concern for the welfare of the people. Name me another country that has gone from independence to economic prosperity in merely 40 years? And please don't comment about harsh laws, America has the 5th highest execution rate in the world. Perhaps if you had stricter laws, you'd have lower crime. The country is not in a recession and has a great standard of living, to compare it to Kenya and Thailand is ridiculous, and misleading to people who do not know the real situation and base it on your narrow minded comment.

      October 12, 2011 at 5:41 am | Reply
      • Mike Houston

        The best that can be said for Singapore is that it is nothing more than a clean toilet.
        And, yes, I've been there. And there is no way that I'd even consider living in that
        "benevolent" dictatorship-by-committee. Singapore sucks!

        October 12, 2011 at 3:15 pm |
      • Mike Houston

        I rather live in Texas where oil, gun, and second cousins are cheap and plenty

        October 12, 2011 at 4:14 pm |
      • Mike Houston

        "I rather live in Texas where oil, gun, and second cousins are cheap and plenty"

        I, Mike Houston, didn't make that statement. Singaporean may have...whoever
        said it, tells me more about himself than it does about Texas, guns, or cousins...

        October 12, 2011 at 4:52 pm |
      • Mike Houston

        I, Mike Houston, did not make the last post. I would clearly like to state that any country that isn't christian or allows for guns should be destroyed. Jesus loves Texas and the rest can die

        October 13, 2011 at 1:21 am |
    • j. von hettlingen

      Singapore has this one-party-system which ensures the continuance of its regime-policy – growth and stability – for decades.

      October 12, 2011 at 9:48 am | Reply
    • j. von hettlingen

      We in the West see government and policy changes like a pendulum, sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse.

      October 12, 2011 at 9:50 am | Reply
      • common sense

        you mean from bush to bush II to obama? hmm same policies. Invading other countries, destroying the economy, high unemployment, sticking our nose where it doesn't belong, Iraq and Afghanistan.

        But hey if having different names= changing policies, then go for it

        October 12, 2011 at 11:08 am |
    • common sense

      agreed they should become the west, 98% of the population oppressed by the 2% rich. High unemployment. A congress that does absolutely nothing but yells at each other. And invades 3rd world country for oil and minerals (iraq and Afghanistan). Indeed these people should hurry up to the 21st century.

      Destruction and murder= civilized nations.

      October 12, 2011 at 11:10 am | Reply
    • kelvin

      You know, I actually do think you are Singaporean. I am Singaporean too, and I happen to think that your view of the world is rather myopic. sadly, it reflects our country's general lack of political maturity, notwithstanding our material achievements. let me address some of your comments.

      "The place where the current president only won 30% of the vote?" Well, the same could be said of all the other 3 candidates who ran, all of who got less than the current president. You may say the system for choosing the President isn't perfect, but to somehow suggest that this invalidates him is disingenuous – would you say the same if your favorite candidate won? American presidents can win the Presidency without winning the popular vote either.

      "accountability for high profile scandals like losses from the Youth Olympic Games, the renaming of Marina Bay to Marina Bay, and the escape of a major wanted terrorist?"

      if you spoke to people all round the world, you would know that the YOG is more than about making money. Seems kind of a strange argument coming from many of us in Singapore since on one hand we slam the government for "always thinking about money" and "forgetting the other things like arts and culture" and this is the argument we throw at the YOG. It may surprise you to know that the YOG won us quite a bit of recognition all round the world. As does our running of the Night Race.

      As for the "renaming of Marina Bay to Marina Bay" – if only you knew the truth. Sometimes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. The contract for the consultant was to develop a proposal for the redevelopment of Marina Bay. This they did – and one small part of it, which the media chose to play on, was the question of the name. You really should speak to someone from the Urban Redevelopment Authority to get the facts. Do you really think all the development in Marina Bay now started out of nothing?

      As for the escape of the terrorist, the people directly in charge were disciplined. Having served in a similar uniformed force before, my opinion is that this is the appropriate level of dealing with the issue, as far as discipline is concerned. If I'm the idiot commander who let him escape, I will man up and take all the responsibility for it. Why should my higher commander bear responsibility for my negligence? But beyond discipline, action may also be necessary to address any structural issues that may have enabled this to happen. It's unspoken in your comment, but you seem to think that this structural problem extends to the Minister. Well, explain how. Incidentally, it is a virtue to be rational and to deal with problems at the right level. Being reactionary and sacking the top guy is useless in addressing problems. Your call for "accountability" therefore seems to ring hollow to me.

      "Where legalized casinos were pushed through despite the opposition of the general public?"
      Really? You represent the public? Do you know that a majority are indifferent to the creation of casinos? I suggest you stop thinking that your view represents that of most Singaporeans. You really ought to question your assumptions. Furthermore, you should know that the right to be heard is not the same as the right to be heeded. Just because you don't like the decision does not mean it is not the right one. (for the record, I don't like the casinos either)

      "Where opposition politicians were disqualified from running in elections for a technicality, but technicalities that should have disqualified the ruling PAP were ignored?"
      I know which technicality you are talking about, but I disagree with you that it would disqualify the PAP, or to be more accurate, that particular candidate. What it does do, however, is cast the PAP MP involved in a bad light. I expected the PAP to take disciplinary action, which they did not. That is disappointing to me.

      You know, I have shown your list of gripes to other international friends of mine. They find it amusing that we Singaporeans think that they are "big problems". They certainly don't think so. The fact that Singaporeans hold our politicians to high standards is an admirable thing, and we should maintain that. But let us not lose perspective in the process. If you want to make it a better place then identify the root problem and advocate for the changes you think are necessary. Grumbling is what teenagers do.

      October 13, 2011 at 8:10 pm | Reply
    • johnny

      Please get your facts correct, Singapore is not in recession. Its growth for 2011 is on target which is 5-6%. A little knowledge is dangerous my friend. Unless you are living and working in Singapore, your dont know anything about this underated and often ignored dynamic country. And definitely NO CORRUPTION will be tolerated in Singapore.

      October 16, 2011 at 12:15 pm | Reply
      • johnny

        For your ignorant mentality heres another fact – Singapore has the 5th largest sovereign wealth in the world. A country without any natural resources, its survival and prosperity depends largely on the wits of its leaders. And hard work and skills of its people. Singapore has ZERO national debt, US haS US$14 Trillion national debt, Get it?

        October 16, 2011 at 12:23 pm |
  5. Champagne MUST flow

    I have no doubt in my mind if protests in US get out of hand and things turn ugly, there would be no problem for US to send National Guard and US Army on its citizens too.

    We are all talking about Middle Eastern revolutions and we are all hoping for them to have regime change, but there is absolutely no chance of that happening in the US.

    There will be no regime change in the US or even much impact on “the way business is done”, the blood will flow on Wall Street much sooner than the champagne will stop!

    October 12, 2011 at 2:49 am | Reply
    • heyheyhey

      those who questions US policies are "terrorists." Those who are for american policies are "freedom fighters." Like how we supported those "freedom fighters" in Egypt and now they're killing each other over religion.

      October 12, 2011 at 10:51 am | Reply
  6. Singaporean

    In reply to Do your homework first – I live in Singapore and it is by far the cleanest, safest, most vibrant city I've ever been to. You can walk in the streets in any place in Singapore and not have to fear for your life, or being mugged, gunned down, attacked by drug addicts, etc. There is a vibrant arts scene and political debate here, and it is narrow minded to comment on politics here unless you truly understand it. How is the American system better, where the House, Senate, President are locked in eternal political deadlock with no concern for the welfare of the people. Name me another country that has gone from independence to economic prosperity in merely 40 years? And please don't comment about harsh laws, America has the 5th highest execution rate in the world. Perhaps if you had stricter laws, you'd have lower crime. The country is not in a recession and has a great standard of living, to compare it to Kenya and Thailand is ridiculous, and misleading to people who do not know the real situation and base it on your narrow minded comment

    October 12, 2011 at 5:42 am | Reply
    • kristina becker

      We Americans are so afraid to say that someone else is doing anything better than us that it is almost a joke already. The ego of America is so fragile and so aware that it is about to crack that the denial is only going to get worse before it gets better. There are, of course, many good places on this green planet that are good. Most people just aren't ready to see how bad it is around them. It is sad to see these times.

      October 13, 2011 at 12:10 am | Reply
    • kelvin

      there is one point in his post that I agree with. The Gini coefficient is not a problem in itself, but it is reflective of a developing issue. I think Singaporeans who live elsewhere in the world know that it is laughable to just compare countries using the Gini. Everyone could be really comfortable or really poor in a country that has a high Gini, simply because it is a relative measurement of wealth distribution. That said, there are poor people in a country, and unfettered capitalism does tend to increase the Gini, especially with the design of the global economy today. And our government is seriously thinking about policies about income distribution and economic mobility – and they have been thinking hard about it for some years, even before the recent election. The challenge is that generally, redistributive policies are hard to implement, and hard for people to accept (no matter what our complainers say about how much they care about the problem, wait till they realise that the solution will affect THEIR wallets). Contrary to popular belief, the Singaporean government is worrying about the problem even before it becomes one – when someone decides to do an Occupy Wall Street here. I see that as an example of far-sighted planning.

      October 13, 2011 at 8:22 pm | Reply
      • johnny

        How do you explain why Singapore has the most millionaires in the world – a whopping 19.9% of its people are millionaires. The mext highest is only 9%. Which means for every 5 Singaporeans you meet on the street one is a millionaire. So, go eat your heart out LOL. Like I said , a little knowlege is dangerous my friends.

        October 16, 2011 at 12:30 pm |
  7. Parker East

    Here is my contribution to the movement... so far. Pass it along.

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6xrMZwnS-o&w=640&h=360]

    Worth watching..... subscribe if you like it.

    October 12, 2011 at 5:43 am | Reply
  8. krm1007

    "Experimental Democracy" has failed in India. An experiment that was being shoved down India's throat by western countries too eager to propagate their own values on a country that was trying to decolonize itself while trying to shed the communist skin of being a Soviet ally. India was thus trapped. What has become evident now is that this "Experimental Democracy" has marginalized the country. The marginalized groups of the country – Dalits and ‘backward’ castes/classes, indigenous ‘tribal’ people and religious minorities have been disenfranchised. "The belief that corruption is the important issue in the country is shared only by the minority living in urban areas and towns who have been beneficiaries of economic liberalization policies mandated by western countries. The most important challenges of Indian society remain as follows: justice, social and economic equality and equal access to certain standards of life for all Indians. “While India seems too eager to please its western masters and put on a progressive and softer face for CNN for public consumption, people see through it. The consequences of this "Band – Aid" approach will be brutal for India geo-politically when it realizes that the GDP statistics that it has been relying to gage its progress has not amounted to much in the long run. The western nations will siphon this Indian productivity into its coffers. So what we see is "British (now AMERICAN) East India Company

    October 12, 2011 at 8:59 am | Reply
    • Onesmallvoice

      Quite true krm1007, quite true!

      October 12, 2011 at 11:14 am | Reply
    • XYZ

      Hey lauda kareem think about your country pakstan first.. loudekebaal

      October 13, 2011 at 3:07 am | Reply
  9. Onesmallvoice

    It seems to me that the fact that this Iranian "plot to assassinate" the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. has been "discovered by the F.B.I. and D.E.A." in order to get the peoples's minds off the sorry state of our economy and those demonstrating for more accountability. Nice ploy guys. How repulsive!!!

    October 12, 2011 at 11:12 am | Reply
    • 2fast2furious

      Funny, 1 day after subpoenas were issued for holder and his goons, we have this. I bet you that they'll foil a WMD plan to destroy the US on the day the patriotic act expires

      October 12, 2011 at 11:22 am | Reply
  10. Rick McDaniel

    Well, don't look for accountability from Obama. His administration can't account for much of that almost $800 billion stimulus he has already wasted. About all they bothered to track, was the unemployment benefits extension.

    October 12, 2011 at 11:32 am | Reply
    • Wall street

      they went to us. and there's nothing you peons can do about it

      October 12, 2011 at 11:36 am | Reply
  11. BEAR

    Obama lit this fire...3 yrs of constant villification against oil companies, oil execs, corporate jets, people earning "too much", wallstreet vs. mainstreat...etc...etc...

    is this what he promised? hope? is this presidential?

    this president is a populist using peoples unfortunate situation for his own personal political gain. shame on obama.

    October 12, 2011 at 1:19 pm | Reply
  12. NOT DEMOCRACY-USEFUL IDIOTS

    Started by far left libs, using idiots who believe in something else and now openly working with communists:

    This is an exciting time! Thousands of mainly young people have been occupying Wall Street for three weeks already, and the “Occupy Movement” has spread to more than 200 other cities. On Oct. 6 the actions spread to our nation’s capital.

    The Communist Party USA (CPUSA) will hold a national teleconference to discuss it:

    Arturo Cambron
    The Communist Party and the Occupy L.A. Movement
    Tuesday, October 11, 8 pm Eastern
    Teleconference number: 605-475-4850 (please note this is the corrected number. ignore previous.)
    Access code: 1053538#

    Southern California Party leader Arturo Cambron will share how the CPUSA and Young Communist League (YCL) are working in “Occupy Los Angeles.”

    This movement, also known as the “99% movement,” is being hailed across the country. Movements and organizations are reaching out in solidarity. The AFL-CIO is opening union halls and offering other material assistance. Ordinary people are donating food, money and materials.

    October 12, 2011 at 2:09 pm | Reply
    • Mike Houston

      If you think your communists have a better solution to good governance you need to go check
      with a lot of Russians, N Koreans, Cubans, and, yes, the Chinese about what you're hoping
      for. You communists are injecting yourselves into this "Occupy Wall Street" phenomenon
      because that's ALL that your lot is good for: rabble-rousing. BUTT OUT, fool!!!

      October 12, 2011 at 4:21 pm | Reply
      • I know all see all

        Yes communists are occupying wall street and they should be dealt with. It has nothing to do with the mortgage crisis, high unemployment, loss of wages, destruction of the economy, etc. Yes communists are at blame. It's not capitalism that's at fault.

        No wonder your name is Mike Houston, only someone from Texas would think like you

        October 13, 2011 at 11:03 am |
  13. Gethetruth

    The problem is not with the form of governance, whether a country is a democracy, social, communist or monarchy or religions, crime must be punished and is controlled and this is fundamental to human societies. Hijacked capitalism is not new, it began when the first pilgrims landed here. The Gun culture and taking and killing of natives is all hijacked capitalism that has it roots in Social Darwinism, which was approved by the Church of all denominations back then and citizens justified their crimes as God approved, because the White Man declared himself the chosen one of God.

    The lack of accoutability in goverment and corporate organizations in the US is because they know that they can get away with it under "collective irresponsibility." To many to prosecute or to big to fail are the same thing. This is becasue all these crimes are comitted by subverting the laws or before laws are put in place. Laws are changed to loot the people and the peoples representatives facilitate it for their own gains. The corporate organizations fool the people into thinking that they are electing their favorite reperesentative, but in fact, you are electing the Corporate organisations representative. They are all very accountable to their sponsoring Masters ! You cannot make rational comparisons between systems of government, simply because in every system there are criminals and they get what they want if people are dreaming, especially the American Dream ! You wake up and find it is a nightmare. All those who had this Nightmare are gathering in large cities and Wall Street is one of them.

    October 12, 2011 at 2:37 pm | Reply
    • wall street

      it's not a crime unless we define it as a crime. What I've done was not defined as a crime. Thus, I can keep doing whatever I want without recourse

      October 12, 2011 at 4:11 pm | Reply
    • Mike Houston

      "...the White Man declared himself the chosen one of God." That's as racist a statement as any white man ever
      made. And "the American Dream ! You wake up and find it is a nightmare" is nonsense uttered by somebody
      who's efforts haven't propelled him into an economically successful position. In short, you're little more than a
      failed cry-baby. And you'd probably be a failure in whatever system of governance you found yourself in...

      October 12, 2011 at 4:40 pm | Reply
  14. Mike Houston

    "As Nicholas Kulish recently reported in the New York Times, “protesters share something else...
    contempt, toward traditional politicians and the democratic political process.
    ...They are taking to the streets, in part, because they have little faith in the ballot box.”

    Khanna, you and Kulish are both wrong. How you two draw the conclusions that you do is probably
    a reflection of wherever it is that the two of you originated. The fact that "New York, Cairo, Tel Aviv, New Delhi, London and Madrid have all become sites of popular discontent" is NOT and indication that those "discontented"
    are disenchanted with democracy. It is an indication that they are unhappy with greedy plutocratic, corrupt
    oligarchy. And in the case of the "Arab Spring" the protestors are fed up with militaristic NON-democratic
    governmental brutality that provides neither JOBS, civil liberty, nor personal security...

    This article by Khann simply shows that he has very distorted notions about the purposes and intent of
    "democracy" as a model for governance. And if he wants to preach about "transparency" or "corruption"
    in governance he needs to be preaching to the Chinese, Russians, N Koreans, Cubans, Pakistanis, Iranians,
    Sudanese, Saudis, Nigerians... and, yes, to the Singaporeans too...the list is endless.

    October 12, 2011 at 4:07 pm | Reply
    • kelvin

      It seems to me that the root of their unhappiness is with the sense that society isn't fair and just. Add to that the fear about jobs and basically being able to survive... They have pinned the blame on what you call the "greedy, plutocratic etc. etc.". The problem is, I don't see that the leadership, corporate leadership is any different from those a decade ago. Will "restoring democracy", as you seem to suggest, make any material difference to the root cause of the problem? Pinning the blame on the leadership is often the simplest thing to do. If the US doesn't make progress in identifying the root causes of the problem (which may necessitate adapting the values that underpin American society – such as a strong sense of individualism over collectivism etc) then they will simply use the democratic process to keep swapping political elites every 4 years or so. It's like how many African countries used to keep changing dictators. It gives a fresh jolt of hope every time, but really, nothing of import has changed.

      October 13, 2011 at 8:34 pm | Reply
  15. Mike Houston

    Seems to me Khanna may be an admirer of Julien Assange ("accountability" and all that that entails).
    Anyway, if he is I wonder how loud he'll scream when Assange hacks Singapore's computers and
    governmental secrets...

    October 12, 2011 at 5:27 pm | Reply
    • the truth

      That probably won't happen because Julian Assange didn't hack the US government computers. Someone else did and he published them. But you probably didn't know what.

      And why would singapore have anything to hide? It's not like they're going around the world bombing countries to pieces and forcing other people to like them. Or hiding something called "fast and furious." Or committing crime against humanity and war crimes.

      u mad bro?

      October 13, 2011 at 11:00 am | Reply
  16. RSEN

    Let us not undermine the term DEMOCRACY,the undisputed system for transparent authorization, just because of the present hurdles in the process of governance for the time being. Otherwise what about Chinese formula for the lucrative results?

    October 13, 2011 at 6:57 am | Reply
  17. Antispetic

    Rather than relying on 3rd parties describing Singapore (some rather colorful accounts I must say), why don't those interested drop by my country and take a look. Anyone is free to come and go with a passport.
    Take a first-hand look of my country and you can make up your mind on what the country is like. For me, it's not utopia, and it's certainly not perfect. But I will never swap this country for another one. I'm sure many in the U.S. will do the same too for their country. Guess this is what patroitism is all about. Drop by and say hi to the friendly folks in Singapore.

    October 14, 2011 at 1:45 am | Reply
  18. kenneth chamberland

    Why don't world goverments just inact a non-violen ,vooleentry draft and let the people go to work,With all the bad weather to come we the people have a lot of work just on our inferstructure..If the goverment dont have any money for us,Well there got planty of empty homes for pay and retirement,health care..DA
    KNIGHTS tEMPLAR

    October 14, 2011 at 11:00 am | Reply
  19. kenneth chamberland

    I think we should put all the ones running for president into a think tank together and see ho can do the best for america and then let them be president...just like any other job..prove.yourself...No one in the real world gets a job and keeps it by just talking...
    KNIGHTS tEMPLAR

    October 14, 2011 at 11:25 am | Reply
  20. Walmartramen

    For the main part, the statement on Wall street, is many
    & all different views of why & what for.
    But it is all of the facts we all are one.
    People are seeing this road we have been on is fake.
    People see that it is just a ride & they are getting off the ride!!!

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxwG8RxQ5Zc&w=640&h=360]

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLDwIU9-bF4&w=640&h=360]

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGK84Poeynk&w=640&h=360]

    http://current.com/http://www.panarchy.org/russell/idleness.1932.html

    October 14, 2011 at 12:39 pm | Reply
  21. Walmartramen

    There is too much poverty & the rich getting richer, not caring!
    http://www.youtube.com/WALMARTRAMEN#g/c/B073A243315B697B

    October 14, 2011 at 12:41 pm | Reply
  22. johnny

    The key to Singapore's success is accountability. And the sharing of nation' s wealth. Which means every budget year the Government distributes all budget surpluses back to the people. And this has been going on for so many years, we get money from the Government. Budget day is always a celebration day for the people. I bet most you detractors dont know thiss as a fact 🙂 It s so unlike US where budget day is a lot of misery- like how to avoid the national debts problem by raising debt default ceiling.

    October 16, 2011 at 12:41 pm | Reply
  23. BEAR

    Why?

    because the president, the dems and their friends have calculated that class warfare is the road to reelection. soros, the media, the unions have all bet that unleashing the populist genie is the tactical thing to do...never mind that it hold no water, but trying to put the genie back in the bottle can prove difficult and dangerous.

    October 16, 2011 at 3:37 pm | Reply

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